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An Acad Bras Cienc. 2019;91(1):e20180107. doi: 10.1590/0001-3765201920180107. Epub 2019 Apr 8.

Effect of the intake of high or low glycemic index high carbohydrate-meals on athletes' sleep quality in pre-game nights.

Author information

1
Pós-Graduação Interdisciplinar em Ciências da Saúde, Universidade Federal de São Paulo/UNIFESP, Av. Ana Costa, 95, Vila Mathias, 11060-001 Santos, SP, Brazil.
2
School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Wellington Road, Clayton, Victoria 3800, Melbourne, Australia.
3
Departamento de Biociências, Universidade Federal de São Paulo/UNIFESP, Rua Silva Jardim, 136, 11015-020 Santos, SP, Brazil.
4
Departamento de Saúde, Educação e Sociedade, Universidade Federal de São Paulo/UNIFESP, Rua Silva Jardim, 136, 11015-020 Santos, SP, Brazil.
5
Departamento de Ciências do Movimento Humano, Universidade Federal de São Paulo/UNIFESP, Rua Silva Jardim, 136, 11015-020 Santos, SP, Brazil.

Abstract

This study investigated the effect of the intake of high (HGI) or low glycemic index (LGI) high-carbohydrate meals on athletes' sleep. Nine basketball adult male athletes were assessed during a championship and received high-carbohydrate meals (dinner and evening snack) with HGI or LGI. Quantitative and qualitative sleep variables were assessed: sleep latency (LAT), sleep efficiency (EFIC), Wake After Sleep Onset (WASO), sleep time through actigraphy and sleep diary. Dietary intake, satiety, sleepiness, glycemic response, salivary cortisol and melatonin were also assessed. On both days most athletes had LAT and WASO higher than recommendation, and nocturnal sleep time below the recommendations. There was no difference between sleep and hormonal parameters according to GI dietary manipulations; however, correlations were observed between sleep and diet. Daily energy intake had negative correlation with efficiency and nocturnal total sleep time, and a positive correlation with WASO, regardless of the GI nocturnal meals. No differences were observed in salivary cortisol and melatonin according to GI. The results suggest that food intake throughout the day seems to exert more influence on sleep parameters of basketball players than GI manipulation of evening meals on the pre-night game, but further studies are necessary to better understand this complex relationship.

PMID:
30994759
DOI:
10.1590/0001-3765201920180107
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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