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Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2019 Apr 16. doi: 10.1007/s00127-019-01703-z. [Epub ahead of print]

Pre-marital predictors of marital violence in the WHO World Mental Health (WMH) Surveys.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry, Center for the Study of Traumatic Stress, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, 4301 Jones Bridge Road, Bethesda, MD, 20814, USA.
2
Department of Behavioral Medicine and Psychiatry, School of Medicine, West Virginia University, 64 Medical Center Drive, Morgantown, WV, 26506, USA.
3
Injury Control Research Center, West Virginia University, 3606 Collins Ferry Road, Research Ridge, Suite 201, Morgantown, WV, 26508, USA.
4
Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, West Virginia University, 364 Medical Center Drive, Morgantown, WV, 26506, USA.
5
Health Services Research Unit, IMIM-Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute, Barcelona, Spain.
6
CIBER en Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Barcelona, Spain.
7
Pompeu Fabra University (UPF), Barcelona, Spain.
8
Núcleo de Epidemiologia Psiquiátrica, LIM 23, Instituto de Psiquiatria Hospital das Clinicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.
9
Department of Mental Health, Moi University School of Medicine, Eldoret, Kenya.
10
Department of Psychiatry and Mental Health, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, Republic of South Africa.
11
Lisbon Institute of Global Mental Health and Chronic Diseases Research Center, NOVA Medical School, NOVA University of Lisbon, Lisbon, Portugal.
12
Department of Health Care Policy, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
13
Departament of Mental Health, National Center of Public Health and Analyses, Sofia, Bulgaria.
14
Department of Psychiatry, University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria.
15
Institute for Development, Research, Advocacy & Applied Care (IDRAAC), Beirut, Lebanon.
16
Department of Psychiatry and Clinical Psychology, Faculty of Medicine, Balamand University, Beirut, Lebanon.
17
Department of Psychiatry and Clinical Psychology, St George Hospital University Medical Center, Beirut, Lebanon.
18
Department of Information, Evidence and Research, World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland.
19
Department of Psychiatry, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Tai Po, Hong Kong.
20
Survey Research Center, Institute for Social Research, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.
21
Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria.
22
University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria.
23
Department of Psychological Medicine, University of Otago, Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand.
24
VA Boston Healthcare System, Boston, MA, USA.
25
Department of Social Medicine, Postgraduate Program in Public Health, Federal University of Espírito Santo, Vitoria, Brazil.
26
Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA.
27
Department of Behavioral Medicine and Psychiatry, School of Medicine, West Virginia University, 64 Medical Center Drive, Morgantown, WV, 26506, USA. rbossarte@hsc.wvu.edu.
28
Injury Control Research Center, West Virginia University, 3606 Collins Ferry Road, Research Ridge, Suite 201, Morgantown, WV, 26508, USA. rbossarte@hsc.wvu.edu.
29
Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, West Virginia University, 364 Medical Center Drive, Morgantown, WV, 26506, USA. rbossarte@hsc.wvu.edu.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a pervasive public health problem. Existing research has focused on reports from victims and few studies have considered pre-marital factors. The main objective of this study was to identify pre-marital predictors of IPV in the current marriage using information obtained from husbands and wives.

METHODS:

Data from were obtained from married heterosexual couples in six countries. Potential predictors included demographic and relationship characteristics, adverse childhood experiences, dating violence, and psychiatric disorders. Reports of IPV and other characteristics from husbands and wives were considered independently and in relation to spousal reports.

RESULTS:

Overall, 14.4% of women were victims of IPV in the current marriage. Analyses identified ten significant variables including age at first marriage (husband), education, relative number of previous marriages (wife), history of one or more categories of childhood adversity (husband or wife), history of dating violence (husband or wife), early initiation of sexual intercourse (husband or wife), and four combinations of internalizing and externalizing disorders. The final model was moderately predictive of marital violence, with the 5% of women accounting for 18.6% of all cases of marital IPV.

CONCLUSIONS:

Results from this study advance understanding of pre-marital predictors of IPV within current marriages, including the importance of considering differences in the experiences of partners prior to marriage and may provide a foundation for more targeted primary prevention efforts.

KEYWORDS:

Epidemiology; International; Intimate partner violence; Mental health; Predictive modeling

PMID:
30993376
DOI:
10.1007/s00127-019-01703-z

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