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Nutrients. 2019 Apr 15;11(4). pii: E850. doi: 10.3390/nu11040850.

Chokeberry Juice Containing Polyphenols Does Not Affect Cholesterol or Blood Pressure but Modifies the Composition of Plasma Phospholipids Fatty Acids in Individuals at Cardiovascular Risk.

Author information

1
Center of Research Excellence in Nutrition and Metabolism, Institute for Medical Research, University of Belgrade, 11000 Belgrade, Serbia. biljana.pokimica@hotmail.com.
2
Research Group on Quality, Safety and Bioactivity of Plant Foods, Campus de Espinardo, Centro de Edafología y Biología Aplicada del Segura-Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (CEBAS-CSIC), P.O. Box 164, 30100 Murcia, Spain. mtconesa@cebas.csic.es.
3
Center of Research Excellence in Nutrition and Metabolism, Institute for Medical Research, University of Belgrade, 11000 Belgrade, Serbia. manjazecimr@gmail.com.
4
Center of Research Excellence in Nutrition and Metabolism, Institute for Medical Research, University of Belgrade, 11000 Belgrade, Serbia. minaizdravko@yahoo.com.
5
Center of Research Excellence in Nutrition and Metabolism, Institute for Medical Research, University of Belgrade, 11000 Belgrade, Serbia. slavica.rankovic.imr@gmail.com.
6
Center of Research Excellence in Nutrition and Metabolism, Institute for Medical Research, University of Belgrade, 11000 Belgrade, Serbia. nevenakardum@gmail.com.
7
Center of Research Excellence in Nutrition and Metabolism, Institute for Medical Research, University of Belgrade, 11000 Belgrade, Serbia. g5petrovic@gmail.com.
8
Center of Research Excellence in Nutrition and Metabolism, Institute for Medical Research, University of Belgrade, 11000 Belgrade, Serbia. sandrakonic@gmail.com.
9
Center of Research Excellence in Nutrition and Metabolism, Institute for Medical Research, University of Belgrade, 11000 Belgrade, Serbia. mglibetic@gmail.com.

Abstract

Chokeberry polyphenols have been suggested to reduce cholesterol and blood pressure and thus protect against cardiovascular diseases (CVD), but the evidence in humans is limited and inconsistent. This randomized double-blinded three-parallel groups trial investigated the changes in various anthropometric and clinical biomarkers, and in plasma phospholipids fatty acids (PPFA) in volunteers at cardiovascular risk after a four-week intervention with 100 mL/day of (1) chokeberry juice with a high-dose of polyphenols (1177.11 mg gallic acid equivalents, GAE); (2) chokeberry juice with a low-dose of polyphenols (294.28 mg GAE) and; (3) a nutritionally matched polyphenol-free placebo drink. Our results indicate that the intake of chokeberry juice containing either the low or the high dose of polyphenols cannot be linked with a reduction in total- and low-density lipoprotein (LDL)cholesterol or in systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) blood pressure in comparison with the consumption of the placebo drink. However, we found evidence of moderate changes in the PPFA, i.e., increased saturated fatty acids (SFA), mostly palmitic acid, and reduced n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), principally linoleic acid (LA) with the intake of chokeberry against the placebo. These effects may be associated with the polyphenols but we could not differentiate a clear dose-response effect. Further research is still needed to elucidate the contribution of the polyphenolic fraction to the potential cardiovascular effects of the chokeberry and to build up the evidence of its potential benefit via the modulation of PPFA composition.

KEYWORDS:

Aronia; SFA; anthocyanins; blood pressure; cardiovascular risk factors; hyperlipidemia; n-6 PUFA; obesity; palmitic acid; polyphenols

PMID:
30991718
PMCID:
PMC6520894
DOI:
10.3390/nu11040850
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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