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Glia. 2019 Aug;67(8):1462-1477. doi: 10.1002/glia.23620. Epub 2019 Apr 16.

Low-intensity transcranial magnetic stimulation promotes the survival and maturation of newborn oligodendrocytes in the adult mouse brain.

Author information

1
Menzies Institute for Medical Research, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia.
2
Experimental and Regenerative Neurosciences, School of Biological Sciences, University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
3
Brain Plasticity Lab, Perron Institute for Neurological and Translational Science, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.

Abstract

Neuronal activity is a potent extrinsic regulator of oligodendrocyte generation and central nervous system myelination. Clinically, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is delivered to noninvasively modulate neuronal activity; however, the ability of rTMS to facilitate adaptive myelination has not been explored. By performing cre-lox lineage tracing, to follow the fate of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells in the adult mouse brain, we determined that low intensity rTMS (LI-rTMS), administered as an intermittent theta burst stimulation, but not as a continuous theta burst or 10 Hz stimulation, increased the number of newborn oligodendrocytes in the adult mouse cortex. LI-rTMS did not alter oligodendrogenesis per se, but instead increased cell survival and enhanced myelination. These data suggest that LI-rTMS can be used to noninvasively promote myelin addition to the brain, which has potential implications for the treatment of demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis.

KEYWORDS:

adaptive myelination; cortex; internode; myelin; oligodendrocyte survival; oligodendrogenesis; transcranial magnetic stimulation

PMID:
30989733
DOI:
10.1002/glia.23620

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