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AIDS Behav. 2019 Apr 15. doi: 10.1007/s10461-019-02505-9. [Epub ahead of print]

Psychosocial Factors Associated with Food Insufficiency Among People Living with HIV/AIDS (PLWH) Initiating ART in Ethiopia.

Author information

1
Institute for Implementation Science in Population Health, City University of New York, 55 West 125th Street, New York, NY, 10027, USA. madeline.dilorenzo@bmc.org.
2
Department of Maternal and Child Health, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA.
3
Institute for Implementation Science in Population Health, City University of New York, 55 West 125th Street, New York, NY, 10027, USA.
4
Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy, City University of New York, New York, NY, USA.
5
HIV Center for Clinical and Behavioral Studies, Columbia University and New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, NY, USA.
6
Department of Epidemiology, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA.
7
Division of HIV, Infectious Diseases and Global Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California, USA.
8
International Center for AIDS Care and Treatment Program (ICAP), Columbia University, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

Abstract

Food insufficiency is associated with suboptimal HIV treatment outcomes. Less is known about psychosocial correlates of food insufficiency among PLWH. This sample includes 1176 adults initiating antiretroviral therapy at HIV clinics in Ethiopia. Logistic regression modeled the association of psychological distress, social support, and HIV-related stigma with food insufficiency. Among respondents, 21.4% reported frequent food insufficiency. Psychological distress [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 2.61 (95% CI 1.79, 3.82)], low social support [aOR 2.20 (95% CI 1.57, 3.09)] and enacted stigma [aOR 1.69 (95% CI 1.26, 2.25)] were independently associated with food insufficiency. Food insufficiency interventions should address its accompanying psychosocial context.

KEYWORDS:

ART; Food insufficiency; HIV; Psychological distress; Social support; Stigma

PMID:
30989554
DOI:
10.1007/s10461-019-02505-9

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