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Nutrients. 2019 Apr 3;11(4). pii: E776. doi: 10.3390/nu11040776.

Decaffeinated Green Tea Extract Does Not Elicit Hepatotoxic Effects and Modulates the Gut Microbiome in Lean B6C3F₁ Mice.

Author information

1
Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR 72205-7199, USA. GurleyBillyJ@uams.edu.
2
Center for Dietary Supplements Research, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR 72205-7199, USA. GurleyBillyJ@uams.edu.
3
Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR 72205-7199, USA. IRacinemiousse@uams.edu.
4
Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR 72205-7199, USA. IRacinemiousse@uams.edu.
5
Department of Biomedical Informatics, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR 72205-7199, USA. INookaew@uams.edu.
6
Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR 72205-7199, USA. LEEwing@uams.edu.
7
Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR 72205-7199, USA. LEEwing@uams.edu.
8
Center for Dietary Supplements Research, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR 72205-7199, USA. CMSkinner@uams.edu.
9
Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR 72205-7199, USA. CMSkinner@uams.edu.
10
Department of Biomedical Informatics, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR 72205-7199, USA. PJenjaroenpun@uams.edu.
11
Department of Biomedical Informatics, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR 72205-7199, USA. CMSkinner@uams.edu.
12
Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR 72205-7199, USA. SKennonmcgill@uams.edu.
13
National Center for Natural Product Research, School of Pharmacy, The University of Mississippi, University, MS 38677, USA. bavula@olemiss.edu.
14
National Center for Natural Product Research, School of Pharmacy, The University of Mississippi, University, MS 38677, USA. jbae7@olemiss.edu.
15
Center for Dietary Supplements Research, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR 72205-7199, USA. MMcgill@uams.edu.
16
Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR 72205-7199, USA. MMcgill@uams.edu.
17
Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR 72205-7199, USA. MMcgill@uams.edu.
18
Department of Biomedical Informatics, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR 72205-7199, USA. DWUssery@uams.edu.
19
National Center for Natural Product Research, School of Pharmacy, The University of Mississippi, University, MS 38677, USA. ikhan@olemiss.edu.
20
Center for Dietary Supplements Research, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR 72205-7199, USA. IKoturbash@uams.edu.
21
Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR 72205-7199, USA. IKoturbash@uams.edu.

Abstract

The main purpose of this study was to investigate the hepatotoxic potential and effects on the gut microbiome of decaffeinated green tea extract (dGTE) in lean B6C3F₁ mice. Gavaging dGTE over a range of 1X-10X mouse equivalent doses (MED) for up to two weeks did not elicit significant histomorphological, physiological, biochemical or molecular alterations in mouse livers. At the same time, administration of dGTE at MED comparable to those consumed by humans resulted in significant modulation of gut microflora, with increases in Akkermansia sp. being most pronounced. Results of this study demonstrate that administration of relevant-to-human-consumption MED of dGTE to non-fasting mice does not lead to hepatotoxicity. Furthermore, dGTE administered to lean mice, caused changes in gut microflora comparable to those observed in obese mice. This study provides further insight into the previously reported weight management properties of dGTE; however, future studies are needed to fully evaluate and understand this effect.

KEYWORDS:

catechins; green tea extract; hepatotoxicity; herbal dietary supplements; microbiome

PMID:
30987244
PMCID:
PMC6521095
DOI:
10.3390/nu11040776
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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