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Phys Ther Sport. 2019 May;37:171-178. doi: 10.1016/j.ptsp.2019.04.002. Epub 2019 Apr 5.

Ankle bracing's effects on lower extremity iEMG activity, force production, and jump height during a Vertical Jump Test: An exploratory study.

Author information

1
School of Kinesiology, Lakehead University, Thunder Bay, Canada; Applied Health Sciences, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada. Electronic address: hendersz@myumanitoba.ca.
2
School of Kinesiology, Lakehead University, Thunder Bay, Canada; Northern Ontario School of Medicine, Thunder Bay, Canada.
3
School of Kinesiology, Lakehead University, Thunder Bay, Canada.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine if softshell (AE) and semi-rigid (T1) ankle braces affect lower extremity iEMG activity, force, and jump height during a Vertical Jump Test.

DESIGN:

Repeated measures, crossover.

SETTING:

Laboratory.

PARTICIPANTS:

42 healthy, active individuals.

OUTCOME MEASURES:

Vertical jump height, iEMG activity, peak vGRF.

RESULTS:

There was significant change across conditions in lateral gastrocnemius (LG) iEMG activity, F(2,70) = 5.31, p = .007, ηp2 = 0.132, with T1 LG iEMG being significantly less (-2.08(99% CI, -3.98 to 0.18) %MVIC, p = .004) than no brace. Significant changes were seen in rectus femoris (RF) iEMG activity, F(2,68) = 6.36, p = .003, ηp2 = 0.158, with T1 RF iEMG activity being significantly less than AE RF iEMG activity (-2.78(99% CI, -5.36 to -0.19) %MVIC, p = .005). There was a significant change in vertical jump height across conditions, F(2,78) = 22.13, p < .0005, ηp2 = 0.362, with a significant decrease in the AE (-2.41(99% CI, -3.66 to -1.17) cm, p < .0005) and T1 conditions (-2.89(99% CI,-4.56 to -1.23) cm, p < .0005), compared to no brace.

CONCLUSION:

Vertical jump height is significantly reduced when wearing ankle braces. Effects on lower extremity iEMG activity are dependent upon brace type.

KEYWORDS:

Ankle braces; Ankle prophylaxis; Electromyography; External ankle support; Vertical jump

PMID:
30981962
DOI:
10.1016/j.ptsp.2019.04.002

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