Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Microb Pathog. 2019 Apr 11. pii: S0882-4010(18)30614-4. doi: 10.1016/j.micpath.2019.04.013. [Epub ahead of print]

Influences of stress hormones on microbial infections.

Author information

1
Department of Pharmaceutical Microbiology, School of Life Science and Technology, China Pharmaceutical University, Jiangsu Province, Nanjing, 210009, PR China.
2
Department of Clinical Pharmacology, School of Pharmacy, Nanjing Medical University, Jiangsu Province, Nanjing, 211166, PR China.
3
Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University, Jiangsu Province, Nanjing, 211166, PR China.
4
Faculty of Animal Production and Technology, The Cholistan University of Veterinary and Animal Sciences, Bahawalpur, 6300, Pakistan.
5
State Key Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry for Life Sciences, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University. Jiangsu Province, Nanjing, 210093, PR China.
6
Department of Pharmaceutical Engineering, School of Pharmacy, China Pharmaceutical University, Jiangsu Province, Nanjing, 210009, PR China.
7
Department of Clinical Pharmacy, School of Basic Medicine and Clinical Pharmacy, China Pharmaceutical University, Jiangsu Province, Nanjing, 211198, PR China.
8
Department of Neurosurgery, Fourth School of Clinical Medicine, Nanjing Medical University Affiliated Brain Hospital, Nanjing, 211166, Jiangsu Province, PR China.
9
Department of Pharmaceutical Microbiology, School of Pharmacy, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing, 210009, Jiangsu Province, PR China.
10
Department of Microbiological and Biochemical Pharmacy, School of Life Science, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing, 210009, Jiangsu Province, PR China.
11
Department of Pharmaceutical Microbiology, School of Life Science and Technology, China Pharmaceutical University, Jiangsu Province, Nanjing, 210009, PR China. Electronic address: chuweihua@cpu.edu.cn.

Abstract

Stress hormones have been recently suggested to influence the pathogenicity of bacteria significantly. Stress has been identified as part of the factors causing an outbreak of infections in the aquaculture industry. The most studied neuroendocrine hormonal family from a microbial endocrinology perspective is the catecholamine comprising of norepinephrine, epinephrine, and dopamine. It is of importance that catecholamine affects the growth and virulence of bacteria. The influence of stress on bacterial infections is attributed to the ability of catecholamines to suppress the immune system as the mode of action for increased bacterial growth. Catecholamines have increased the growth of bacteria, virulence-associated factors, adhesions, and biofilm formation and consequently influence the outcome of infections by these bacteria in many hosts. The siderophores and the ferric iron transport system plays a vital role in the mechanism by which catecholamines stimulates growth and exposure of genes to stress hormones enhances the expression of genes involved in bacterial virulence. In recent years, it has been discovered that intestinal microflora takes part in bidirectional communication between the gut and brain. The rapidly growing field of microbiome research, understanding the communities of bacteria living within our bodies and the genes they contain is yielding new perspectives. This review reveals catecholamines effects on the growth and virulence of bacteria and the latest trends in microbial endocrinology.

KEYWORDS:

Bacteria; Catecholamines; Microbial endocrinology; Microbial pathogens; Microbiota; Quorum sensing

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center