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Vet Parasitol. 2019 Apr;268:98-104. doi: 10.1016/j.vetpar.2019.03.005. Epub 2019 Mar 18.

An oral dose of Fluralaner administered to dogs kills pyrethroid-resistant and susceptible Chagas disease vectors for at least four months.

Author information

1
Universidad de Buenos Aires, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Laboratory of Eco-Epidemiology, Ciudad Universitaria, C1428EHA, Buenos Aires, Argentina; Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas-Universidad de Buenos Aires, Instituto de Ecología, Genética y Evolución de Buenos Aires (IEGEBA), Ciudad Universitaria, C1428EHA, Buenos Aires, Argentina.
2
Universidad de Buenos Aires, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Laboratory of Eco-Epidemiology, Ciudad Universitaria, C1428EHA, Buenos Aires, Argentina; Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas-Universidad de Buenos Aires, Instituto de Ecología, Genética y Evolución de Buenos Aires (IEGEBA), Ciudad Universitaria, C1428EHA, Buenos Aires, Argentina. Electronic address: mvcardinal@ege.fcen.uba.ar.
3
Universidad de Buenos Aires, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Laboratory of Eco-Epidemiology, Ciudad Universitaria, C1428EHA, Buenos Aires, Argentina.

Abstract

New vector control tools that can fit into a broader integrated vector management strategy are notably lacking. We conducted a seven-month randomized trial to assess the efficacy of a single oral dose of Fluralaner (Bravecto®) administered to dogs on the blood-feeding success, engorgement levels and mortality of pyrethroid-resistant and -susceptible Triatoma infestans third- and fifth-instar nymphs. The trial included 10 Fluralaner-treated and 10 placebo-treated (control) outbred healthy dogs residing in rural houses of the Argentine Chaco. Most (92.7%) of the 3017 triatomines exposed were able to blood-feed. Generalized linear models showed that blood-feeding success was not significantly modified by Fluralaner treatment, time posttreatment and their interaction. However, pyrethroid-susceptible fifth instars blood-fed significantly more frequently than susceptible third instars, and no significant differences were observed between the latter and resistant fifth instars. Engorgement levels were not significantly modified by Fluralaner treatment, time posttreatment and their interaction. Nearly all the triatomines that blood-fed on treated dogs up to 60 days posttreatment (DPT) died within 24 h regardless of pyrethroid susceptibility status combined with bug stage. Cumulative bug mortality over 4 days postexposure remained high over 90-120 DPT (70-81% in susceptible third and fifth instars, and 47-49% in resistant fifth instars), and was virtually nil at 210 DPT. Triatomines that fed on control dogs suffered marginal mortality (0-4%) except at 4 and 30 DPT. Fluralaner and xenointoxication are eligible for Phase III efficacy trials alone or combined with other methods in the frame of an integrated vector management strategy in areas with or without pyrethroid resistance.

KEYWORDS:

Fluralaner; Integrated vector control management; Pyrethroid resistance; Triatomine bugs; Xenointoxication

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