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Acad Pediatr. 2019 Apr 10. pii: S1876-2859(19)30111-1. doi: 10.1016/j.acap.2019.04.001. [Epub ahead of print]

Parental Dual use of E-cigarettes and Traditional Cigarettes.

Author information

1
Massachusetts General Hospital for Children, Division of General Academic Pediatrics, Boston, MA, United States; Massachusetts General Hospital, Tobacco Research and Treatment Center, Boston, MA, United States.
2
Massachusetts General Hospital, Tobacco Research and Treatment Center, Boston, MA, United States.
3
Massachusetts General Hospital, Tobacco Research and Treatment Center, Boston, MA, United States; Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA; Massachusetts General Hospital, Mongan Institute Health Policy Center.
4
University of Rochester Medical Center, Department of Public Health Sciences, Rochester, NY.
5
American Academy of Pediatrics, Julius B. Richmond Center of Excellence, Itasca, IL.
6
Massachusetts General Hospital for Children, Division of General Academic Pediatrics, Boston, MA, United States; Massachusetts General Hospital, Tobacco Research and Treatment Center, Boston, MA, United States; Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA; American Academy of Pediatrics, Julius B. Richmond Center of Excellence, Itasca, IL.. Electronic address: jwinickoff@mgh.harvard.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

E-cigarettes are growing in popularity. Dual use of e-cigarettes and cigarettes is an increasingly common practice, but little is known about patterns of dual use in parents.

OBJECTIVES:

To describe smoking-related behaviors among dual-users.

METHODS:

Parent exit surveys were conducted following their child's visit in five control pediatric practices in five states participating in the CEASE trial. We examined factors associated with dual use of e-cigarettes and cigarettes vs. cigarette-only smokers, assessed by self-report.

RESULTS:

Of 1382 smokers or recent quitters screened after their child's visit between April-October 2017, 943 (68%) completed the survey. Of these, 727 parents reported current use of cigarettes; and of those, 81 (11.1%) also reported e-cigarette use, meeting the definition of dual use. Compared to cigarette-only smokers, dual users were more likely to have a child younger than 1-year old, planned to quit in the next 6 months, and had tried to quit in the past (had a quit attempt in the past 3 months, called the quitline or used medicine to quit in the past 2 years; P<.05 for each).

CONCLUSION:

Parents who use both e-cigarettes and cigarettes may have higher rates of contemplating smoking cessation than parents who only smoke cigarettes. These parents may be using e-cigarettes for harm reduction or as a step towards cessation. Identification of these parents may provide an opportunity to deliver effective treatment, including nicotine replacement therapies that do not expose infants and children to e-cigarette aerosol.

KEYWORDS:

Parental e-cigarette use; dual use; tobacco control

PMID:
30981026
DOI:
10.1016/j.acap.2019.04.001

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