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Colorectal Dis. 2019 Apr 13. doi: 10.1111/codi.14648. [Epub ahead of print]

Elective colectomy after acute diverticulitis: an international comparison.

Author information

1
Department of Surgery (Western Health), The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
2
Department of Surgery (Royal Melbourne Hospital), The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
3
School of Health Sciences, University of Surrey, Surrey, UK.

Abstract

AIM:

Routine elective colectomy after acute diverticulitis is not recommended, yet significant numbers are still being performed. Amidst global concern over the rising costs of surgery and the value of healthcare, acute diverticulitis is a disease that is amenable to optimization of strategies for operative intervention. We aim to compare rates of elective colectomy after acute diverticulitis in the USA, England and Australia.

METHOD:

Index unplanned admissions for acute diverticulitis were found from an international administrative dataset between 2008 and 2012 for hospitals in the USA, England and Australia. Recurrent unplanned admissions for acute diverticulitis and any subsequent elective admissions for colectomy were found between 2008 and 2014 to allow a minimum 2-year follow-up period. The primary outcome measured was elective colectomy rate. Secondary outcomes included rates of emergency operative intervention and recurrence. Multivariable analysis was performed to control for patient and disease factors.

RESULTS:

There were 7842 index unplanned admissions for acute diverticulitis over 4 years in selected hospitals from the USA, England and Australia. The elective colectomy rates were 13%, 5.4% and 3.4% for the USA, England and Australia, respectively. The propensity for elective colectomy was higher in the USA (OR 4.2, P < 0.001) and England (OR 1.8, P < 0.001) than in Australia. The recurrence rate in all patients with acute diverticulitis was 10% across the countries.

CONCLUSION:

There is a higher propensity for elective colectomy after acute diverticulitis in the USA than in England and Australia. This highlights the possibilities for a less aggressive surgical approach to reduce resource utilization, but prospective analysis of information on quality of life is required to support this.

KEYWORDS:

Diverticulitis; administrative data; health service; outcomes; surgical treatment

PMID:
30980588
DOI:
10.1111/codi.14648

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