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J Sci Food Agric. 2019 Aug 15;99(10):4842-4848. doi: 10.1002/jsfa.9750. Epub 2019 May 7.

Effect of low-temperature storage on the content of folate, vitamin B6 , ascorbic acid, chlorogenic acid, tyrosine, and phenylalanine in potatoes.

Author information

1
Department of Botany and Plant Pathology, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, USA.
2
Hermiston Agricultural Research and Extension Center, Oregon State University, Hermiston, OR, USA.
3
School of Biological Sciences, Washington State University, Pullman, WA, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Changes in the metabolite composition of potato tubers during low-temperature storage can affect their nutritional value, susceptibility to bruising, and processing qualities. Here, we measured changes in the amounts of folate, vitamin B6 , and vitamin C, and the blackspot pigment precursors chlorogenic acid and tyrosine, as well as phenylalanine, in five potato varieties stored at 7.8 °C for 8 months in 2015 and 2016.

RESULTS:

Folate content increased in all varieties in both years during low-temperature storage, with statistically significant changes occurring in six out of eight conditions. Increase rates ranged from 11% to 141%. Vitamin B6 content increased in all varieties during the storage period, but changes were statistically significant in only two out of eight conditions. Increase rates ranged from 5% to 24%. Ascorbic acid content decreased in all varieties in both years during the storage period. Decrease rates ranged from 16% to 78%, and were statistically significant in seven out of eight conditions. For chlorogenic acid, no consistent trend was observed. Changes varied between -14% and +14%, but none was statistically significant. Tyrosine content increased in all varieties in both years, except in Sage Russet in 2015. Increase rates ranged from 19% to 238% and were statistically significant in three out of seven conditions. Changes in phenylalanine content were very similar to those observed for tyrosine, with increases up to 272% in Teton Russet.

CONCLUSIONS:

These results show that storage at low temperature substantially affects tuber nutritional quality and biochemical bruising potential. © 2019 Society of Chemical Industry.

KEYWORDS:

chlorogenic acid; folates; pyridoxal phosphate; tyrosine; vitamin C

PMID:
30980531
DOI:
10.1002/jsfa.9750
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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