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J Affect Disord. 2019 Jun 1;252:55-59. doi: 10.1016/j.jad.2019.04.033. Epub 2019 Apr 8.

Ventral attention-network effective connectivity predicts individual differences in adolescent depression.

Author information

1
College of Psychology and Sociology, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen, China; Key Laboratory of Mental Health, Institute of Psychology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China; Center for Brain Disorders and Cognitive Neuroscience, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen, China.
2
College of Psychology and Sociology, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen, China; Center for Brain Disorders and Cognitive Neuroscience, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen, China.
3
College of Psychology and Sociology, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen, China.
4
Key Laboratory of Mental Health, Institute of Psychology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China; Department of Psychology, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
5
Key Laboratory of Mental Health, Institute of Psychology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China; Department of Psychology, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China. Electronic address: lixy@psych.ac.cn.
6
College of Psychology and Sociology, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen, China; Centre for Emotion and Brain, Shenzhen Institute of Neuroscience, Shenzhen, China; Department of Psychology, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, China. Electronic address: luoyj@szu.edu.cn.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Stimulus-driven negative attention bias is a central deficit in depression and might play an important role in vulnerability to depression Adolescents are susceptible to depression. Thus, investigating the neural correlates of attention bias in adolescents is a critical step for identifying neural markers of early onset of depression. Previous studies have shown that the ventral attention network (VAN), which includes bilateral ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC) and bilateral temporal-parietal junction (TPJ), is the key brain network for stimulus-driven attention. However, the relationship between depression and effective connectivity within the VAN in adolescents is poorly understood.

METHOD:

We employed resting-state fMRI to assess the relationship between directional effective connectivity within the VAN and depression scores in 216 healthy adolescents.

RESULTS:

Using stochastic dynamic modeling, we found that individuals who exhibited higher self-reported depression showed stronger effective connectivity between right VLPFC and left TPJ within the VAN.

LIMITATION:

The level of depression in this study was assessed with self-reported questionnaire. This measure might be more influenced by current mood in adolescents than that in adults. Future studies should emplo more objective measures to index levels of depression.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our findings indicate that effective connectivity between right VLPFC and left TPJ could at least partially serve as a biomarker for bottom-up processing of depression in adolescents.

KEYWORDS:

Attention bias; Depression; Resting-state fMRI; Stochastic dynamic causal modelling; Ventral attention network

PMID:
30978625
DOI:
10.1016/j.jad.2019.04.033

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