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Addict Behav. 2019 Aug;95:206-210. doi: 10.1016/j.addbeh.2019.04.003. Epub 2019 Apr 3.

Longitudinal associations between smoking and affect among cancer patients using varenicline to quit smoking.

Author information

1
Department of Preventive Medicine, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, United States of America.
2
Department of Psychiatry, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, United States of America.
3
Department of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, & Critical Care, University of Pennsylvania, PA, United States of America.
4
Department of Preventive Medicine, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, United States of America. Electronic address: b-hitsman@northwestern.edu.

Abstract

During a quit attempt, high negative affect predicts relapse to smoking. In this study, we evaluated bidirectional longitudinal associations between smoking and negative affect among cancer patients treated with varenicline. Participants (N = 119, 50% female, Mage = 59 years) were smokers (≥5 cigarettes/week) who were diagnosed with cancer and were recruited for a 24-week trial of extended duration varenicline plus behavioral counseling; data for this secondary analyses were drawn from the 12-week open-label phase of the trial. Smoking was assessed via self-reported number of cigarettes in the past 24 h. Negative affect was assessed using the Positive and Negative Affect Scale (PANAS). Data were collected at pre-quit (week 0), target quit day (week 1), week 4, and week 12. We evaluated cross-lagged panel models for negative affect and smoking using PROC CALIS in SAS. Models were run separately for participants who were adherent (≥80% of medication taken) or nonadherent to varenicline. Among adherent participants (n = 96), smoking accounted for up to 22% of variance in subsequent negative affect throughout treatment. Cross-lagged associations were not observed between smoking and negative affect among non-adherent participants (n = 23). Negative affect did not predict subsequent smoking among either adherent or nonadherent participants. These results suggest that varenicline may attenuate abstinence-induced negative affect among cancer patients treated for nicotine dependence.

KEYWORDS:

Adherence; Affect; Cancer; Randomized controlled trial; Smoking cessation

PMID:
30978583
PMCID:
PMC6545135
[Available on 2020-08-01]
DOI:
10.1016/j.addbeh.2019.04.003

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