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Australas J Ageing. 2019 Apr 11. doi: 10.1111/ajag.12652. [Epub ahead of print]

Characteristics of chiropractors who manage people aged 65 and older: A nationally representative sample of 1903 chiropractors.

Author information

1
Faculty of Health, University of Technology Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
2
Chiropractic Academy for Research Leadership.
3
Department of Chiropractic, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Macquarie University, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
4
Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, Faculty of Health and Social Sciences, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong SAR, China.
5
Department of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
6
Nordic Institute of Chiropractic and Clinical Biomechanics, Odense, Denmark.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To examine the prevalence and profile of chiropractors who frequently manage people aged 65 years and older.

METHODS:

A national cross-sectional survey collected practitioner characteristics, practice settings and clinical management characteristics. Multiple logistic regression was conducted on 1903 chiropractors to determine the factors associated with the frequent treatment of people 65 years and older.

RESULTS:

In total, 73.5% of participants report "often" treating those aged 65 years and older. These chiropractors were associated with treating degenerative spine conditions (OR [odds ratio] 2.25; 95% [confidence interval] CI 1.72-2.94), working in a non-urban area (OR 1.85; 95% CI 1.35-2.54), treating low back pain (referred/radicular) (OR 1.74; 95% CI 1.26-2.40) and lower limb musculoskeletal disorders (OR 1.50; 95% CI 1.15-1.96).

CONCLUSIONS:

The majority of chiropractors report often providing treatment to older people. Our findings call for more research to better understand older patient complaints that are common to chiropractic practice and the care provided by chiropractors for this patient group.

KEYWORDS:

ageing; chiropractic; manual therapy; older patients; practice-based research network

PMID:
30977304
DOI:
10.1111/ajag.12652

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