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Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2019 Apr 11. doi: 10.1007/s11356-019-04971-z. [Epub ahead of print]

Ambient air pollution and risk of type 2 diabetes in the Chinese.

Author information

1
Ningbo Municipal Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Ningbo, 315010, China.
2
Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA, 70112, USA.
3
Population Wellbeing and Environment Research Lab (Power Lab), Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW, 2522, Australia.
4
Early Start, Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW, 2522, Australia.
5
Menzies Centre for Health Policy, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, 2006, Australia.
6
Department of Preventive Medicine, Medical School of Ningbo University, Ningbo, 315211, China.
7
School of Public Health, Kunming Medical University, Kunming, China. 190145121@qq.com.

Abstract

We performed a time series analysis to investigate the potential association between exposure to ambient air pollution and type 2 diabetes (T2D) incidence in the Chinese population. Monthly time series data between 2008 and 2015 on ambient air pollutants and incident T2D (N = 25,130) were obtained from the Environment Monitoring Center of Ningbo and the Chronic Disease Surveillance System of Ningbo. Relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) of incident T2D per 10 μg/m3 increases in ambient air pollutants were estimated from Poisson generalized additive models. Exposure to particulate matter < 10 μm (PM10) and sulfur dioxide (SO2) was associated with increased T2D incidence. The relative risks (RRs) of each increment in 10 μg/m3 of PM10 and SO2 were 1.62 (95% CI, 1.16-2.28) and 1.63 (95% CI, 1.12-2.38) for overall participants, whereas for ozone (O3) exposure, the RRs were 0.78 (95% CI, 0.68-0.90) for overall participants, 0.78 (95% CI, 0.69-0.90) for males, and 0.78 (95% CI, 0.67-0.91) for females, respectively. Exposure to PM10 and SO2 is positively associated with T2D incidence, whereas O3 is negatively associated with T2D incidence.

KEYWORDS:

Ambient air pollutants; Incidence; Type 2 diabetes

PMID:
30977004
DOI:
10.1007/s11356-019-04971-z

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