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Sci Data. 2019 Apr 11;6(1):24. doi: 10.1038/s41597-019-0016-7.

Physical activity, sleep and cardiovascular health data for 50,000 individuals from the MyHeart Counts Study.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA. hershman@stanford.edu.
2
Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA. hershman@stanford.edu.
3
Sage Bionetworks, Seattle, WA, USA.
4
Department of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA.
5
Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA.
6
Ted Rogers Centre of Excellence for Heart Function, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
7
Stanford Center for Cardiovascular Innovation, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA.
8
Stanford Center for Biomedical Ethics, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA.
9
Stanford Center on Longevity, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA.
10
Stanford Prevention Research Center, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA.
11
VA Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, California, USA.
12
Stanford Sleep Center, Stanford University, Palo Alto, California, USA.
13
Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Department of Engineering Science, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom.
14
Big Data Institute, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom.
15
Verily Life Sciences LLC, South San Francisco, California, USA.
16
Department of Genetics, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA.

Abstract

Studies have established the importance of physical activity and fitness for long-term cardiovascular health, yet limited data exist on the association between objective, real-world large-scale physical activity patterns, fitness, sleep, and cardiovascular health primarily due to difficulties in collecting such datasets. We present data from the MyHeart Counts Cardiovascular Health Study, wherein participants contributed data via an iPhone application built using Apple's ResearchKit framework and consented to make this data available freely for further research applications. In this smartphone-based study of cardiovascular health, participants recorded daily physical activity, completed health questionnaires, and performed a 6-minute walk fitness test. Data from English-speaking participants aged 18 years or older with a US-registered iPhone who agreed to share their data broadly and who enrolled between the study's launch and the time of the data freeze for this data release (March 10 2015-October 28 2015) are now available for further research. It is anticipated that releasing this large-scale collection of real-world physical activity, fitness, sleep, and cardiovascular health data will enable the research community to work collaboratively towards improving our understanding of the relationship between cardiovascular indicators, lifestyle, and overall health, as well as inform mobile health research best practices.

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