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MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2019 Apr 12;68(14):321-325. doi: 10.15585/mmwr.mm6814a1.

Extragenital Chlamydia and Gonorrhea Among Community Venue-Attending Men Who Have Sex with Men - Five Cities, United States, 2017.

Author information

1
Houston Health Department.
2
University of Texas Health Science Center.
3
University of Miami.
4
Florida Department of Health.
5
New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene.
6
San Francisco Department of Public Health.
7
District of Columbia Department of Health.
8
George Washington University.

Abstract

Sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) disproportionately affect gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (MSM) in the United States (1). Because chlamydia and gonorrhea at extragenital (rectal and pharyngeal) anatomic sites are often asymptomatic, these anatomic sites serve as a reservoir of infection, which might contribute to gonococcal antimicrobial resistance (2) and increased risk for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission and acquisition (3). To ascertain prevalence of extragenital STDs, MSM attending community venues were recruited in five U.S. cities to provide self-collected swabs for chlamydia and gonorrhea screening as part of National HIV Behavioral Surveillance (NHBS). Overall, 2,075 MSM provided specimens with valid results, and 13.3% of participants were infected with at least one of the two pathogens in at least one of these two extragenital anatomic sites. Approximately one third of participating MSM had not been screened for STDs in the previous 12 months. MSM attending community venues had a high prevalence of asymptomatic extragenital STDs. The findings underscore the importance of sexually active MSM following current recommendations for STD screening at all exposed anatomic sites at least annually (4).

PMID:
30973847
PMCID:
PMC6459584
DOI:
10.15585/mmwr.mm6814a1
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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