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J Equine Vet Sci. 2018 May;64:81-88. doi: 10.1016/j.jevs.2018.02.021. Epub 2018 Feb 27.

Treatment of Hydropsical Conditions Using Transcervical Gradual Fetal Fluid Drainage in Mares With or Without Concurrent Abdominal Wall Disease.

Author information

1
Department of Health Management, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE, Canada. Electronic address: md649@cornell.edu.
2
Departments of Population Medicine, Ontario Veterinary College, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada.
3
Department of Large Animal Clinical Sciences, Western College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada.
4
Department of Health Management, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE, Canada.
5
Department of Pathology and Microbiology, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE, Canada.

Abstract

Hydropsical conditions are exceedingly rare in the horse. However, when they occur, they are true emergencies due to the severe enlargement of the pregnant uterus, which can result in clinical signs, such as an enlarged round abdomen, dyspnea, reluctance to walk, and colic, and may lead to the development of abdominal wall disease. The pathogenesis of hydropsical conditions is not fully elucidated, but they have been associated with placentitis and fetal abnormalities. This report describes six cases of hydropsical conditions in mares with or without concurrent abdominal wall disease. Five out of six cases were hydrallantois, and of these five, two mares had abdominal wall disease; the remaining one out of six cases was hydramnios. All mares were treated by termination of the pregnancy through gradual fluid drainage transcervically over a number of hours, and their fetuses were delivered vaginally. All fetuses were euthanized immediately after vaginal delivery. Of the six mares, two had signs of placentitis, two were confirmed seropositive for leptospirosis, and two were euthanized (one because of a vaginal tear that communicated through the peritoneum and one mare that developed abdominal wall rupture and laminitis). The remaining 4 mares were available for follow-up; three mares were not rebred, and one mare became an embryo donor, with a successful embryo recovery. We reported the prevalence of leptospira involvement in two out of six cases of hydrallantois and also described the clinical outcome of the mares after treatment with slow fetal fluid drainage.

KEYWORDS:

Abdominal wall disease; Fetal fluid; Hydrallantois; Hydramnios; Leptospirosis; Transcervical

PMID:
30973158
DOI:
10.1016/j.jevs.2018.02.021

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