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Physiology (Bethesda). 2019 May 1;34(3):178-188. doi: 10.1152/physiol.00035.2018.

Sex, Oxidative Stress, and Hypertension: Insights From Animal Models.

Author information

1
Departments of Cell and Molecular Biology, University of Mississippi Medical Center , Jackson, Mississippi.
2
Mississippi Center of Excellence in Perinatal Research, University of Mississippi Medical Center , Jackson, Mississippi.
3
Women's Health Research Center, University of Mississippi Medical Center , Jackson, Mississippi.
4
Medicine, Endocrinology Division, University of Mississippi Medical Center , Jackson, Mississippi.

Abstract

One of the mechanisms responsible for blood pressure (BP) regulation is thought to be oxidative stress. In this review, we highlight preclinical studies that strongly support a role for oxidative stress in development and maintenance of hypertension in male animals, based on depressor responses to antioxidants, particularly tempol and apocynin. In females, oxidative stress seems to be important in the initial development of hypertension. However, whether maintenance of hypertension in females is mediated by oxidative stress is not clear. In clinical studies, pharmacological intervention to reduce BP with antioxidants has conflicting results, mostly negative. This review will discuss the uncertainties regarding blood pressure control and oxidative stress and potential reasons for these outcomes.

PMID:
30968750
DOI:
10.1152/physiol.00035.2018
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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