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Front Hum Neurosci. 2019 Mar 22;13:87. doi: 10.3389/fnhum.2019.00087. eCollection 2019.

Migraine in the Young Brain: Adolescents vs. Young Adults.

Author information

1
Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Center for Pain and the Brain, Boston Children's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, United States.
2
Department of Radiology, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, MA, United States.
3
Department of Behavioral Neuroscience, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR, United States.
4
Pediatric Headache Program, Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Boston Children's Hospital, Waltham, MA, United States.
5
Department of Neurology, Boston Children's Hospital, Waltham, MA, United States.
6
Department of Anesthesia, Critical Care and Pain Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, United States.

Abstract

Migraine is a disease that peaks in late adolescence and early adulthood. The aim of this study was to evaluate age-related brain changes in resting state functional connectivity (rs-FC) in migraineurs vs. age-sex matched healthy controls at two developmental stages: adolescence vs. young adulthood. The effect of the disease was assessed within each developmental group and age- and sex-matched healthy controls and between developmental groups (migraine-related age effects). Globally the within group comparisons indicated more widespread abnormal rs-FC in the adolescents than in the young adults and more abnormal rs-FC associated with sensory networks in the young adults. Direct comparison of the two groups showed a number of significant changes: (1) more connectivity changes in the default mode network in the adolescents than in the young adults; (2) stronger rs-FC in the cerebellum network in the adolescents in comparison to young adults; and (3) stronger rs-FC in the executive and sensorimotor network in the young adults. The duration and frequency of the disease were differently associated with baseline intrinsic connectivity in the two groups. fMRI resting state networks demonstrate significant changes in brain function at critical time point of brain development and that potentially different treatment responsivity for the disease may result.

KEYWORDS:

age-related; brain; brain development; functional magnetic resonance imaging; headaches; pediatric; resting-state functional connectivity

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