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J Perinatol. 2019 Apr 9. doi: 10.1038/s41372-019-0375-0. [Epub ahead of print]

Maternal anemia and pregnancy outcomes: a population-based study.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California, USA. Rachael.Beckert@ucsf.edu.
2
Department of Pediatrics, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California, USA.
3
California Preterm Birth Initiative, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California, USA.
4
Department of Pediatrics, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California, USA.
5
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

This study aims to describe adverse maternal and neonatal outcomes in women diagnosed with anemia in pregnancy.

STUDY DESIGN:

This was a retrospective cohort study of California live births from 2007-2012, linked to maternal and infant hospital discharge records. Relative risks of adverse maternal and neonatal outcomes were calculated for women with and without anemia.

RESULTS:

Anemic mothers were more likely to be diagnosed with hypertension, diabetes, placental abruption, or chorioamnionitis, or require a blood transfusion or admission to the intensive care unit (aRRs 1.2-6.8). Infants born to anemic mothers were more likely to be born preterm (8.9% versus 6.5%), but not more likely to suffer morbidities associated with prematurity.

CONCLUSION:

In a population-based study, the diagnosis of anemia in pregnancy carries a higher risk of peri-partum, intra-partum, and post-partum complications for the mother, and a higher risk of preterm birth for the infant.

PMID:
30967656
DOI:
10.1038/s41372-019-0375-0

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