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Retina. 2019 Apr 5. doi: 10.1097/IAE.0000000000002543. [Epub ahead of print]

EARLY VITAMIN A SUPPLEMENTATION IMPROVES THE OUTCOME OF RETINOPATHY OF PREMATURITY IN EXTREMELY PRETERM INFANTS.

Author information

1
Departments of Neonatology, and.
2
Ophthalmology, Children's Hospital affiliated to Zhengzhou University, Henan Children's Hospital, Zhengzhou Children's Hospital, Zhengzhou, China.
3
Department of Neonatology, Children's Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, China.
4
Department of Neonatology, Shangqiu People's Hospital, Shangqiu, China.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

This study assessed the efficacy and safety of early vitamin A (VA) supplementation to improve outcomes of retinopathy of prematurity in extremely preterm infants.

METHODS:

A total of 262 eligible extremely preterm infants underwent randomization; of these, 132 were assigned to the VA group and 130 to the control group. The infants were administered a solution of VA (1,500 IU/day), added to their enteral feeds as soon as minimal feeding was introduced and continued for 28 days or until discharge.

RESULTS:

With no adverse effects occurring, serum VA of the VA-supplemented infants on Days 14, 28, and postmenstrual 36 weeks was higher than that of the placebo group (P < 0.001). No signs of VA toxicity or increased intracranial pressure were reported. The VA group had lower unadjusted rates of Type 1 retinopathy of prematurity (1.6 vs. 6.9%, P = 0.030) and bronchopulmonary dysplasia (18.9 vs. 33.8%, P = 0.008) than the control group. Regression analysis revealed an association between serum VA levels and risk of Type 1 retinopathy of prematurity (beta = -2.37).

CONCLUSION:

Vitamin A supplementation reduced VA deficiency in extremely preterm infants; it was associated with a decreased incidence of Type 1 retinopathy of prematurity and may also have a positive impact on reducing bronchopulmonary dysplasia.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially without permission from the journal.

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