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Curr Treat Options Oncol. 2019 Apr 8;20(5):42. doi: 10.1007/s11864-019-0641-6.

Treatment of Radiation-Induced Cognitive Decline in Adult Brain Tumor Patients.

Author information

1
Department of Radiation Oncology, Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, Medical Center Blvd, Winston-Salem, NC, 27157, USA. ccramer@wakehealth.edu.
2
Department of Neurology, Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, Winston-Salem, NC, 27157, USA.
3
Department of Radiation Oncology, Section on Radiation Biology, Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, Medical Center Blvd, Winston-Salem, NC, 27157, USA.
4
Department of Hematology/Oncology, Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, Winston-Salem, NC, 27157, USA.
5
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine and Division Public Health Sciences (Social Sciences and Health Policy), Wake Forest School of Medicine, Medical Center Blvd, Winston-Salem, NC, USA.
6
Memory Counseling Program, Section on Gerontology and Geriatric Medicine, Sticht Center on Healthy Aging and Alzheimer's Prevention, Wake Forest Baptist Health, Medical Center Boulevard, Winston-Salem, NC, 27157, USA.
7
Department of Radiation Oncology, Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, Medical Center Blvd, Winston-Salem, NC, 27157, USA.
8
Oncology, Medical Neuro-Oncology and Neuro-Oncology Research Program, Wake Forest Baptist Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical Center Boulevard, Winston-Salem, NC, 27157-1082, USA.

Abstract

Patients with either primary or metastatic brain tumors quite often have cognitive impairment. Maintaining cognitive function is important to brain tumor patients and a decline in cognitive function is generally accompanied by a decline in functional independence and performance status. Cognitive decline can be a result of tumor progression, depression/anxiety, fatigue/sleep dysfunction, or the treatments they have received. It is our opinion that providers treating brain tumor patients should obtain pre-treatment and serial cognitive testing in their patients and offer mitigating and therapeutic interventions when appropriate. They should also support cognition-focused clinical trials.

KEYWORDS:

Attention; Brain; Cognition; Memory; Neuropsychology; Radiation

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