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BMJ Open. 2019 Apr 8;9(4):e026581. doi: 10.1136/bmjopen-2018-026581.

Bidirectional association between migraine and fibromyalgia: retrospective cohort analyses of two populations.

Author information

1
School of Medicine, Fu Jen Catholic University, New Taipei City, Taiwan.
2
Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, FuJen Catholic University Hospital, Fu Jen Catholic University, NewTaipei City, Taiwan.
3
Intended B.S. Molecular and Cell Biology, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, California, USA.
4
Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan.
5
Management Office for Health Data, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan.
6
School of Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan.
7
Department of Bioinformatics and Medical Engineering, Asia University, Taichung, Taiwan.
8
Department of Nuclear Medicine and PET Center, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Fibromyalgia (FM) and migraine are common pain disorders that tend to coexist. This study determined whether these two conditions exhibited any mutual influences.

SETTING:

Cohort study.

PARTICIPANTS:

A retrospective, longitudinal cohort study was conducted using data obtained from a nationwide healthcare database. This study had two arms. Arm 1 comprised 33 216 patients with FM and arm 2 consisted of 7420 patients with migraine; all of these patients were diagnosed between 2000 and 2010. Using the aforementioned database, control subjects who had neither FM nor migraine and were matched with the FM and migraine patients by sex, age and index date of diagnosis were recruited. Each control cohort was four times the size of the corresponding study cohort. Follow-up for the control and study cohorts was conducted until the end of 2011.

RESULTS:

The incidence rates of FM and migraine were calculated in arms 1 and 2, respectively. The overall incidence of migraine was greater in the FM cohort than in the corresponding control cohort (4.39 vs 2.07 per 1000 person-years (PY)); crude HR=2.12, 95% CI=1.96 to 2.30; adjusted HR (aHR)=1.89, 95% CI=1.75 to 2.05). After adjustment for sex, age and comorbidities, the overall incidence of FM in the migraine cohort was 1.57 times greater than that in the corresponding control cohort (7.01 vs 4.49 per 1000 PY; aHR=1.52, 95% CI=1.39 to 1.65).

CONCLUSIONS:

The present study revealed a bidirectional link between FM and migraine.

KEYWORDS:

bidirectional analysis; fibromyalgia; migraine; retrospective cohort

PMID:
30962236
DOI:
10.1136/bmjopen-2018-026581
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Conflict of interest statement

Competing interests: None declared.

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