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Parasite. 2019;26:21. doi: 10.1051/parasite/2019022. Epub 2019 Apr 8.

An outbreak of trichomonosis in European greenfinches Chloris chloris and European goldfinches Carduelis carduelis wintering in Northern France.

Author information

1
UMR 7245 MCAM MNHN CNRS, Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle, 61 rue Buffon, CP52, 75231 Paris Cedex 05, France - Cap-Ornis Baguage, 10 Rue de la Maladrerie, 59181 Steenwerck, France.
2
Laboratoire Départemental d'Analyse du Pas-de-Calais (LDA 62), 2 Rue du Genévrier, SP18, 62022 Arras Cedex, France.
3
Laboratoire Labéo Manche, 1352 Avenue de Paris, CS 33608, 50008 Saint-Lô Cedex, France.
4
Cap-Ornis Baguage, 10 Rue de la Maladrerie, 59181 Steenwerck, France.
5
UMR 7245 MCAM MNHN CNRS, Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle, 61 rue Buffon, CP52, 75231 Paris Cedex 05, France.

Abstract

Avian trichomonosis is a common and widespread disease, traditionally affecting columbids and raptors, and recently emerging among finch populations mainly in Europe. Across Europe, finch trichomonosis is caused by a single clonal strain of Trichomonas gallinae and negatively impacts finch populations. Here, we report an outbreak of finch trichomonosis in the wintering populations of Chloris chloris (European greenfinch) and Carduelis carduelis (European goldfinch) from the Boulonnais, in northern France. The outbreak was detected and monitored by bird ringers during their wintering bird ringing protocols. A total of 105 records from 12 sites were collected during the first quarter of 2017, with 46 and 59 concerning dead and diseased birds, respectively. Fourteen carcasses from two locations were necropsied and screened for multiple pathogens; the only causative agent identified was T. gallinae. Genetic characterization was performed by four markers (small subunit ribosomal RNA, hydrogenosomal iron-hydrogenase, and RNA polymerase II subunit 1 genes, and the internal transcribed spacers (ITS) region) and confirmed the T. gallinae strain to be A1, which affects the finch populations of Europe. This was also confirmed by an ITS-based phylogenetic analysis which further illustrated the diversity of the Trichomonas infecting birds. Preliminary data on the survival and dispersion of infected birds were obtained from ring-returns of diseased individuals. The anthropogenic spread of diseases through bird feeding practices is highlighted and some suggestions to prevent pathogen transmission via backyard supplementary feeders for garden birds are given.

PMID:
30957740
PMCID:
PMC6452646
DOI:
10.1051/parasite/2019022
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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