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J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract. 2019 Nov - Dec;7(8):2583-2591. doi: 10.1016/j.jaip.2019.03.041. Epub 2019 Apr 4.

A Systematic Evaluation of Asthma Management Apps Examining Behavior Change Techniques.

Author information

1
Division of Behavioral Medicine and Clinical Psychology, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio; Department of Pediatrics, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, Ohio. Electronic address: rachelle.ramsey@cchmc.org.
2
Division of Behavioral Medicine and Clinical Psychology, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio.
3
Department of Clinical & Health Psychology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Fla.
4
Clinical Child Psychology Program and Schiefelbusch Institute for Life Span Studies, University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kan.
5
Department of Pediatrics, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, Ohio; Division of Pulmonary Medicine, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio.
6
Division of Behavioral Medicine and Clinical Psychology, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio; Department of Pediatrics, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, Ohio.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Mobile health (mHealth) apps have the potential to facilitate asthma self-management by including medication reminders, allowing self-monitoring of symptoms, improving access and quality of information communicated with provider, and providing educational resources to patients and parents. Many apps exist for asthma management; however, the extent to which apps include evidence-based behavior change strategies has not been examined.

OBJECTIVE:

To review the content and quality of mHealth asthma management apps that are available to patients.

METHODS:

Asthma apps were identified using a systematic search process. Twenty-three apps were coded for presence or absence of behavior change techniques (BCTs) using the taxonomy of BCTs as defined by Abraham and Michie in 2008. Quality ratings were also determined for each app using the Mobile App Rating Scale (MARS).

RESULTS:

The number of BCTs each app used ranged from 1 to 11 (mean, 4). BCTs that were most commonly used were instruction, behavior-health link, self-monitoring, feedback, teach to use prompts/cues, consequences, and others' approval. Overall app quality based on MARS scores ranged from 2.45 to 4.50 (mean, 3.32). Two apps, Kiss myAsthma and AsthmaMD, used at least 8 BCTs and had high quality ratings.

CONCLUSIONS:

Kiss myAsthma and AsthmaMD used at least 8 BCTs and had good quality scores.

KEYWORDS:

Apps; Asthma; Self-management; mHealth

PMID:
30954644
PMCID:
PMC6776707
[Available on 2020-11-01]
DOI:
10.1016/j.jaip.2019.03.041

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