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Sex Med. 2019 Apr 3. pii: S2050-1161(19)30030-3. doi: 10.1016/j.esxm.2019.03.002. [Epub ahead of print]

Provoked Vestibulodynia in Women with Pelvic Pain.

Author information

1
BC Women's Center for Pelvic Pain and Endometriosis, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.
2
Women's Health Research Institute, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.
3
BC Women's Center for Pelvic Pain and Endometriosis, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada; Women's Health Research Institute, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada; Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.
4
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada; BC Centre for Vulvar Health, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.
5
Women's Health Research Institute, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada; Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada; BC Centre for Vulvar Health, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.
6
BC Centre for Vulvar Health, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.
7
BC Women's Center for Pelvic Pain and Endometriosis, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada; Women's Health Research Institute, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada; Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada; BC Centre for Vulvar Health, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. Electronic address: paul.yong@vch.ca.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Pelvic pain and vulvar pain are common conditions in women. In this study, we sought to characterize the clinical picture of patients with concurrent pelvic pain and provoked vestibulodynia (PVD).

AIM:

To analyze the association between sexual/clinical characteristics and a diagnosis of PVD among women with pelvic pain.

METHODS:

Cross-sectional analysis of a prospective registry at a tertiary referral center for pelvic pain and endometriosis, involving consecutive non-menopausal sexually active patients 18-49 years-old seen by a single gynecologist from January 2016-December 2017. The sample was divided into 2 groups: pelvic pain with PVD; and pelvic pain alone (without PVD).

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Superficial dyspareunia and deep dyspareunia on a 11-point numeric rating scale, and the sexual quality-of-life subscale of the Endometriosis Health Profile-30 (0-100%).

RESULTS:

There were 129 patients that met study criteria: one third with pelvic pain and PVD (n = 42) and two-thirds with pelvic pain alone (without PVD) (n = 87). Women with pelvic pain and PVD had significantly more severe superficial dyspareunia ≥7/10 (OR = 12.00 (4.48-32.16), P < .001), more severe deep dyspareunia ≥7/10 (OR = 4.08 (1.83-9.10), P = .001), and poorer sexual quality of life (Endometriosis Health Profile-30 ≥50%) (OR = 4.39 (1.67-11.57), P = .002), compared with the group with pelvic pain alone. Women with pelvic pain and PVD also had more anxiety, depression, and catastrophizing, more frequent tenderness of the bladder and pelvic floor, and more common diagnosis of painful bladder syndrome. On the other hand, there were no significant differences between the 2 groups in terms of dysmenorrhea, chronic pelvic pain, abdominal wall allodynia, positive Carnett test for abdominal wall pain, functional quality of life, endometriosis, and irritable bowel syndrome.

CONCLUSIONS:

In the pelvic pain population, PVD may be associated with more negative impact on dyspareunia, sexual quality of life, and bladder/pelvic floor function, but it may not significantly impact abdominopelvic pain or day-to-day function in general. Bao C, Noga H, Allaire C, et al. Provoked Vestibulodynia in Women with Pelvic Pain. Sex Med 2019;XX:XXX-XXX.

KEYWORDS:

Dyspareunia; Endometriosis; Painful Bladder Syndrome; Pelvic Floor; Pelvic Pain; Vestibulodynia; Vulvodynia

PMID:
30954496
DOI:
10.1016/j.esxm.2019.03.002
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