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Immunol Allergy Clin North Am. 2019 May;39(2):163-175. doi: 10.1016/j.iac.2018.12.005.

The Effects of the Environment on Asthma Disease Activity.

Author information

1
Division of Allergy and Immunology, Boston Children's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 300 Longwood Avenue, Fegan Building, 6th floor, Boston, MA 02115, USA; Division of Rheumatology, Immunology and Allergy, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, USA.
2
Division of Allergy and Immunology, Boston Children's Hospital, 300 Longwood Avenue, Fegan Building, 6th Floor, Boston, MA 02115, USA; Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA.
3
Division of Allergy and Immunology, Boston Children's Hospital, 300 Longwood Avenue, Fegan Building, 6th Floor, Boston, MA 02115, USA; Lebanese American University, Beirut, Lebanon.
4
Division of Allergy and Immunology, Boston Children's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 300 Longwood Avenue, Fegan Building, 6th floor, Boston, MA 02115, USA. Electronic address: Wanda.Phipatanakul@childrens.harvard.edu.

Abstract

Asthma is highly prevalent and causes significant morbidity in children. The development of asthma depends on complex relationships between genetic predisposition and environmental modifiers of immune function. The biological and physical environmental factors include aeroallergens, microbiome, endotoxin, genetics, and pollutants. The psychosocial environment encompasses stress, neighborhood safety, housing, and discrimination. They all have been speculated to influence asthma control and the risk of developing asthma. Control of the factors that contribute to or aggravate symptoms, interventions to eliminate allergen exposure, guidelines-based pharmacologic therapy, and education of children and their caregivers are of paramount importance.

KEYWORDS:

Allergens; Asthma; Asthma morbidity; Disparities; Endotoxin; Environment; Microbiome; Pollutants

PMID:
30954168
PMCID:
PMC6452888
[Available on 2020-05-01]
DOI:
10.1016/j.iac.2018.12.005

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