Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Neuroimage. 2019 Jul 15;195:320-332. doi: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2019.03.073. Epub 2019 Apr 4.

Distinct patterns of default mode and executive control network circuitry contribute to present and future executive function in older adults.

Author information

1
Department of Neuroscience, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, 40536, USA.
2
Sanders-Brown Center on Aging, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, 40536, USA; Department of Neurology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, 40536, USA; Department of Psychiatry, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, 40536, USA.
3
Sanders-Brown Center on Aging, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, 40536, USA; Department of Neurology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, 40536, USA; Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Spectroscopy Center, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, 40536, USA.
4
Department of Neuroscience, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, 40536, USA; Sanders-Brown Center on Aging, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, 40536, USA; Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Spectroscopy Center, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, 40536, USA. Electronic address: brian.gold@uky.edu.

Abstract

Executive function (EF) performance in older adults has been linked with functional and structural profiles within the executive control network (ECN) and default mode network (DMN), white matter hyperintensities (WMH) burden and levels of Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology. Here, we simultaneously explored the unique contributions of these factors to baseline and longitudinal EF performance in older adults. Thirty-two cognitively normal (CN) older adults underwent neuropsychological testing at baseline and annually for three years. Neuroimaging and AD pathology measures were collected at baseline. Separate linear regression models were used to determine which of these variables predicted composite EF scores at baseline and/or average annual change in composite ΔEF scores over the three-year follow-up period. Results demonstrated that low DMN deactivation, high ECN activation and WMH burden were the main predictors of EF scores at baseline. In contrast, poor DMN and ECN WM microstructure and higher AD pathology predicted greater annual decline in EF scores. Subsequent mediation analysis demonstrated that DMN WM microstructure uniquely mediated the relationship between AD pathology and ΔEF. These results suggest that functional activation patterns within the DMN and ECN and WMHs contribute to baseline EF while structural connectivity within these networks impact longitudinal EF performance in older adults.

PMID:
30953834
PMCID:
PMC6536351
[Available on 2020-07-15]
DOI:
10.1016/j.neuroimage.2019.03.073
Free full text

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center