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Resuscitation. 2019 Apr 3;139:33-40. doi: 10.1016/j.resuscitation.2019.03.041. [Epub ahead of print]

Sports activity and paediatric out-of-hospital cardiac arrest at schools in Japan.

Author information

1
Medicine for Sports and Performing Arts, Department of Health and Sport Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, 2-2 Yamada-Oka, Suita 565-0871, Japan.
2
Department of Food Science, Otsuma Women's University, 12 Sanbancho Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-8357, Japan. Electronic address: kiyosuke0817@hotmail.com.
3
Division of Environmental Medicine and Population Sciences, Department of Social and Environmental Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, 2-2 Yamada-Oka, Suita 565-0871, Japan.
4
Division of Environmental Medicine and Population Sciences, Department of Social and Environmental Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, 2-2 Yamada-Oka, Suita 565-0871, Japan; Department of Emergency Medicine, Hyogo Prefectural Kobe Children's Hospital, 1-6-7 Minatojima Chuo-ku, Kobe 650-0047, Japan.
5
Department of Pediatrics, Nihon University School of Medicine, 30-1 Ooyaguchikamichou, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo 173-8610, Japan.
6
Department of Emergency Medicine, Osaka Medical College, 2-7 Daigaku-machi, Takatsuki, Osaka 569-8686, Japan; Department of Pediatrics, Osaka Medical College, 2-7 Daigaku-machi, Takatsuki, Osaka 569-8686, Japan.
7
Kyoto University Health Service, Yoshida Honmachi, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501, Japan.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Sudden cardiac death during exercise or sports is an important problem among young athletes and non-athletes. An understanding of the epidemiological features of sports-related out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) among children is crucial for planning approaches for prevention and better outcomes of paediatric OHCAs. We assessed the characteristics and outcomes of sports-related OHCA among children at schools in Japan to prevent sports-related paediatric OHCA at schools.

METHODS:

The Stop and Prevent cardIac aRrest, Injury, and Trauma in Schools (SPIRITS) is a nationwide, prospective, observational study linking databases of two nationally representative registries. Data on the characteristics and outcomes of sports-related paediatric OHCA at schools in Japan were obtained from these databases.

RESULTS:

Between 2008 and 2015, 188 sports-related paediatric OHCAs due to presumed cardiac origin occurred. The greatest proportion of OHCA during or after sports was due to long-distance running (21.8%), followed by soccer/futsal (13.3%), basketball (12.2%), and baseball/rubber-ball baseball (11.2%). We also assessed the association between prehospital factors and one-month survival with favourable neurological outcome after sports-related OHCA. The proportions of ventricular fibrillation as the first documented rhythm, bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), and public-access defibrillation (PAD) were 87.8%, 87.2%, and 63.3%, respectively. Compared with the non-PAD group, the adjusted odds ratio (95% confidence interval) of the PAD group was 3.64 (1.78-7.45).

CONCLUSIONS:

In Japan, 188 schoolchildren experienced OHCAs of cardiac origin occurring during or after sports activity at schools during the 8-year period. Increasing PAD is essential to enhance better neurological outcome after sports-related OHCA among students.

KEYWORDS:

Basic life support; Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest; School; Sports; Student

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