Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Am Acad Dermatol. 2019 Dec;81(6):1271-1276. doi: 10.1016/j.jaad.2019.03.078. Epub 2019 Apr 3.

A video-based, flipped classroom, simulation curriculum for dermatologic surgery: A prospective, multi-institution study.

Author information

1
Department of Dermatology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. Electronic address: kjliu@bwh.harvard.edu.
2
University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts.
3
Department of Dermatology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.
4
Department of Surgery, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.
5
Department of Dermatology, Tufts Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts.
6
Department of Dermatology, Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra/Northwell, Lake Success, New York.
7
Department of Dermatology, Lahey Hospital and Medical Center, Burlington, Massachusetts.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Medical education is evolving to emphasize trainee engagement. The impact of a flipped classroom curriculum and surgical simulation on dermatology resident education has not been evaluated.

OBJECTIVE:

To assess the impact of video education and surgical simulation on dermatology resident procedural skills.

METHODS:

We created a curriculum on foundational surgical skills for 31 first- and second-year dermatology residents at 3 institutions. The flipped classroom approach replaces traditional in-person lectures with at-home viewing of instructional videos. After this self-directed learning, trainees had 3 hands-on sessions using simulated skin models. The Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skills (OSATS) instrument was used to assess residents performing a simulated elliptical excision with intermediate repair before and after the curriculum. Residents completed precurriculum and postcurriculum surveys evaluating operative confidence and perceived value of the curriculum.

RESULTS:

Residents' total OSATS score increased from a median of 27 (interquartile range, 22-38.5) before the curriculum to 46 (interquartile range, 39.5-51.5) after the curriculum (P < .001). Self-reported confidence in surgical performance significantly improved, and residents were highly satisfied.

LIMITATIONS:

Limitations include the small sample size and potential influence from concurrent learning on surgical rotations.

CONCLUSIONS:

Video education and simulation are effective for improving dermatology residents' procedural skills. We hope to serve as a template for other institutions and nondermatology trainees hoping to improve procedural skills.

KEYWORDS:

dermatologic surgery; dermatology resident education; flipped classroom; medical education; simulation; surgical simulation

PMID:
30953701
DOI:
10.1016/j.jaad.2019.03.078

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center