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ISME J. 2019 Aug;13(8):2018-2030. doi: 10.1038/s41396-019-0412-1. Epub 2019 Apr 5.

Establishment of an induced memory response in Pseudomonas aeruginosa during infection of a eukaryotic host.

Author information

1
Department of Molecular Bacteriology, TWINCORE Centre for Experimental and Clinical Infection Research, Hannover, 30625, Germany.
2
Department of Molecular Bacteriology, Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, 38124, Germany.
3
Department of Chemical Microbiology, Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, 38124, Germany.
4
Research Core Unit Metabolomics and Institute of Pharmacology, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, 30625, Germany.
5
Department of Molecular Bacteriology, TWINCORE Centre for Experimental and Clinical Infection Research, Hannover, 30625, Germany. Susanne.Haeussler@helmholtz-hzi.de.
6
Department of Molecular Bacteriology, Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, 38124, Germany. Susanne.Haeussler@helmholtz-hzi.de.

Abstract

In a given habitat, bacterial cells often experience recurrent exposures to the same environmental stimulus. The ability to memorize the past event and to adjust current behaviors can lead to efficient adaptation to the recurring stimulus. Here we demonstrate that the versatile bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa adopts a virulence phenotype after serial passage in the invertebrate model host Galleria mellonella. The virulence phenotype was not linked to the acquisition of genetic variations and was sustained for several generations, despite cultivation of the ex vivo virulence-adapted P. aeruginosa cells under rich medium conditions in vitro. Transcriptional reprogramming seemed to be induced by a host-specific food source, as reprogramming was also observed upon cultivation of P. aeruginosa in rich medium supplemented with polyunsaturated long-chain fatty acids. The establishment of induced memory responses adds a time dimension and seems to fill the gap between long-term evolutionary genotypic adaptation and short-term induced individual responses. Efforts to unravel the fundamental mechanisms that underlie the carry-over effect to induce such memory responses will continue to be of importance as hysteretic behavior can serve survival of bacterial populations in changing and challenging habitats.

PMID:
30952997
DOI:
10.1038/s41396-019-0412-1

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