Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 2019 Feb 22. pii: S0939-4753(19)30048-1. doi: 10.1016/j.numecd.2019.01.017. [Epub ahead of print]

A within-sibling pair analysis of lifestyle behaviours and BMI z-score in the multi-centre I.Family study.

Author information

1
Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology - BIPS, Bremen, Germany. Electronic address: bogl@leibniz-bips.de.
2
Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden. Electronic address: kirsten.mehlig@gu.se.
3
Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology - BIPS, Bremen, Germany; Institute of Statistics, Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science, University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany. Electronic address: intemann@leibniz-bips.de.
4
Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland. Electronic address: guiomar.masip-manuel@helsinki.fi.
5
Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland. Electronic address: anna.keski-rahkonen@helsinki.fi.
6
Institute of Food Sciences, National Research Council, Avellino, Italy. Electronic address: paola.russo@isa.cnr.it.
7
Department of Public Health, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium. Electronic address: Nathalie.Michels@UGent.be.
8
Copenhagen Business School, Department of Management, Society and Communication, Frederiksberg, Denmark. Electronic address: lre.msc@cbs.dk.
9
Epidemiology and Prevention Unit Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori - Milan, Italy. Electronic address: Valeria.Pala@istitutotumori.mi.it.
10
Centre for Exercise, Nutrition and Health Sciences, School for Policy Studies, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK. Electronic address: Laura.Johnson@bristol.ac.uk.
11
Department of Pediatrics, Medical School, University of Pécs, Pécs, Hungary. Electronic address: denes.molnar@aok.pte.hu.
12
Research and Education Institute of Child Health, Strovolos, Cyprus. Electronic address: tor.michael@cytanet.com.cy.
13
Department of Chronic Diseases, National Institute for Health Development, Tallinn, Estonia. Electronic address: toomas.veidebaum@tai.ee.
14
GENUD (Growth, Exercise, Nutrition and Development) Research Group, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Zaragoza, Zaragoza, Spain. Electronic address: lmoreno@unizar.es.
15
Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology - BIPS, Bremen, Germany; Institute of Statistics, Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science, University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany. Electronic address: ahrens@leibniz-bips.de.
16
Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden. Electronic address: lauren.lissner@gu.se.
17
Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland; Institute of Molecular Medicine FIMM, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland. Electronic address: jaakko.kaprio@helsinki.fi.
18
Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology - BIPS, Bremen, Germany. Electronic address: hebestr@leibniz-bips.de.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND AIMS:

By investigating differences in lifestyle behaviours and BMI in sibling pairs, family-level confounding is minimized and causal inference is improved, compared to cross-sectional studies of unrelated children. Thus, we aimed to investigate within-sibling pair differences in different lifestyle behaviours and differences in BMI z-scores in children and adolescents.

METHODS AND RESULTS:

We examined three groups of sibling pairs 1) all same-sex sibling pairs with maximum 4 years age difference (n = 1209 pairs from 1072 families in 8 countries, mean age 10.7 years, standard deviation 2.4 years), 2) sibling pairs discordant for overweight (n = 262) and 3) twin pairs (n = 85). Usual dietary intake was estimated by 24-h recalls and time spent in light (LPA) and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) was measured by accelerometers. Screen time, sleep and dieting for weight loss were assessed by questionnaires. Within all 3 groups of sibling pairs, more time in MVPA was associated with lower BMI z-score. Higher energy intake was associated with higher BMI z-score within twin pairs and within all sibling pairs who were not currently dieting for weight loss. Regarding LPA, screen time or sleep duration, no or inconsistent associations were observed for the three groups of sibling pairs.

CONCLUSIONS:

MVPA and energy intake were associated with BMI differences within sibling and twin pairs growing up in the same home, thus independent of family-level confounding factors. Future studies should explore whether genetic variants regulating appetite or energy expenditure behaviours account for weight differences in sibling pairs.

KEYWORDS:

Body mass index; Energy intake; MVPA; Overweight-discordant; Sibling pairs; Twin pairs

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center