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Paediatr Child Health. 2019 Apr;24(Suppl 1):S29-S34. doi: 10.1093/pch/pxz018. Epub 2019 Mar 29.

Stakeholder feedback on The CARD™ System to improve the vaccination experience at school.

Author information

1
Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario.
2
The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario.
3
University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario.
4
Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia.
5
Niagara Region Public Health & Emergency Services, Thorold, Ontario.

Abstract

Objective:

School-based vaccination programs can be a source of distress for many students due to the pain from the needle injection and related fears. We created a multifaceted Knowledge Translation (KT) intervention to address vaccination and pain, fear, and fainting called The CARD™ System. The objectives were to document acceptability of key tools included in the multifaceted KT intervention and their effectiveness in improving knowledge and attitudes about vaccination pain and fear.

Methods:

Quantitative and qualitative methods were used. Students, school staff, public health nurses, and parents participated in separate focus groups whereby they independently completed a knowledge and attitudes survey and provided structured and qualitative feedback on key KT tools of the multifaceted KT intervention. They then repeated the knowledge and attitudes survey.

Results:

Altogether, 22 students (grade 6 and 7), 16 school staff (principals, grade 7 and 8 teachers, resource teachers, secretaries), 10 nurses (injecting, charge, and school nurses), and 3 parents participated. Knowledge test scores increased post-KT tool review: 8.5 (2.1) versus 7.3 (1.9); P<0.001. Attitudes were more positive about the individual nature of pain and fear experience during vaccination. Student fear scores were lower post-tool review: 5.1 (2.9) versus 4.6 (3.0); P<0.001. The majority of the participants reported they understood all the information, the amount was just right and that the information was useful.

Discussion:

The KT tools were demonstrated to be acceptable and to improve knowledge. Future research is warranted to determine their impact on student experience during school vaccinations.

KEYWORDS:

Knowledge Translation; Pain management; Vaccination

PMID:
30948920
PMCID:
PMC6438868
[Available on 2020-03-29]
DOI:
10.1093/pch/pxz018

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