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Nat Biomed Eng. 2019 Mar;3(3):194-205. doi: 10.1038/s41551-019-0347-x. Epub 2019 Feb 18.

Large-area MRI-compatible epidermal electronic interfaces for prosthetic control and cognitive monitoring.

Author information

1
Department of Biomedical Engineering, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, USA.
2
Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL, USA.
3
School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
4
Applied Mechanics Laboratory, Department of Engineering Mechanics, Center for Mechanics and Materials and Center for Flexible Electronics Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing, China.
5
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan, Republic of Korea.
6
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL, USA.
7
Department of Psychology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.
8
Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA.
9
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL, USA.
10
Departments of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, and Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, USA.
11
Department of Aerospace Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL, USA.
12
Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Shirley Ryan AbilityLab, Chicago, IL, USA.
13
Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL, USA. jrogers@northwestern.edu.
14
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL, USA. jrogers@northwestern.edu.
15
Departments of Materials Science and Engineering, Biomedical Engineering, Neurological Surgery, Chemistry, Mechanical Engineering, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Simpson Querrey Institute and Feinberg Medical School Center for Bio-Integrated Electronics, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, USA. jrogers@northwestern.edu.

Abstract

Skin-interfaced medical devices are critically important for diagnosing disease, monitoring physiological health and establishing control interfaces with prosthetics, computer systems and wearable robotic devices. Skin-like epidermal electronic technologies can support these use cases in soft and ultrathin materials that conformally interface with the skin in a manner that is mechanically and thermally imperceptible. Nevertheless, schemes so far have limited the overall sizes of these devices to less than a few square centimetres. Here, we present materials, device structures, handling and mounting methods, and manufacturing approaches that enable epidermal electronic interfaces that are orders of magnitude larger than previously realized. As a proof-of-concept, we demonstrate devices for electrophysiological recordings that enable coverage of the full scalp and the full circumference of the forearm. Filamentary conductive architectures in open-network designs minimize radio frequency-induced eddy currents, forming the basis for structural and functional compatibility with magnetic resonance imaging. We demonstrate the use of the large-area interfaces for the multifunctional control of a transhumeral prosthesis by patients who have undergone targeted muscle-reinnervation surgery, in long-term electroencephalography, and in simultaneous electroencephalography and structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging.

PMID:
30948811
DOI:
10.1038/s41551-019-0347-x

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