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Nat Commun. 2019 Apr 4;10(1):1534. doi: 10.1038/s41467-019-09462-w.

Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies provides insights into genetic control of tomato flavor.

Author information

1
INRA, UR1052, Génétique et Amélioration des Fruits et Légumes, Domaine Saint Maurice, 67 Allée des Chênes CS 60094, 84143, Montfavet Cedex, France.
2
Syngenta, 12 Chemin de l'Hobit, Saint Sauveur, 31790, France.
3
MRC Epidemiology Unit & Institute of Metabolic Science, University of Cambridge, Addrenbrooke's Hospital, Box 285, Hills Road, Cambridge, CB2 0QQ, UK.
4
Cardiovascular Epidemiology Unit, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Strangeways Research Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Wort's Causeway, Cambridge, CB1 8RN, UK.
5
Boyce Thompson Institute, Cornell University, 533 Tower Rd, Ithaca, NY, 14853, USA.
6
Genome Analysis Laboratory of the Ministry of Agriculture, Agricultural Genomics Institute at Shenzhen, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, 518124, Shenzhen, Guangdong, China.
7
Key Laboratory of Biology and Genetic Improvement of Horticultural Crops of the Ministry of Agriculture, Sino-Dutch Joint Laboratory of Horticultural Genomics, Institute of Vegetables and Flowers, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, 100081, Beijing, China.
8
Horticultural Sciences, Plant Innovation Center, University of Florida, Post Office Box 110690, Gainesville, FL, 32611, USA.
9
INRA, UR1052, Génétique et Amélioration des Fruits et Légumes, Domaine Saint Maurice, 67 Allée des Chênes CS 60094, 84143, Montfavet Cedex, France. mathilde.causse@inra.fr.

Abstract

Tomato flavor has changed over the course of long-term domestication and intensive breeding. To understand the genetic control of flavor, we report the meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) using 775 tomato accessions and 2,316,117 SNPs from three GWAS panels. We discover 305 significant associations for the contents of sugars, acids, amino acids, and flavor-related volatiles. We demonstrate that fruit citrate and malate contents have been impacted by selection during domestication and improvement, while sugar content has undergone less stringent selection. We suggest that it may be possible to significantly increase volatiles that positively contribute to consumer preferences while reducing unpleasant volatiles, by selection of the relevant allele combinations. Our results provide genetic insights into the influence of human selection on tomato flavor and demonstrate the benefits obtained from meta-analysis.

PMID:
30948717
PMCID:
PMC6449550
DOI:
10.1038/s41467-019-09462-w
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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