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Dysphagia. 2019 Apr 3. doi: 10.1007/s00455-019-10006-z. [Epub ahead of print]

Radiation Dose During Videofluoroscopic Swallowing Studies and Associated Factors in Pediatric Patients.

Author information

1
Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, 101 Daehak-ro, Jongno-gu, Seoul, 03080, Republic of Korea.
2
Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, 101 Daehak-ro, Jongno-gu, Seoul, 03080, Republic of Korea. hgseo80@gmail.com.

Abstract

Although children are more radio-sensitive than adults, few studies have evaluated radiation dosage during videofluoroscopic swallowing study (VFSS) in children. The aim of the study was to investigate the radiation dosage using dose-area product (DAP) for VFSS in pediatric cases and to identify factors affecting the radiation dose. Patients aged 0-17 years who had undergone VFSS were included. The following data were collected retrospectively: DAP; fluoroscopic time; number of tried diets; and clinical characteristics including sex, age, etiology of dysphagia, and recommended feeding type. In the videofluoroscopic field, use of collimation and appearance of metal object, such as a lead apron or a wheel chair, was checked. A total of 290 VFSSs were included. The mean DAP was 5.78 ± 4.34 Gy cm2 with a mean screening time of 2.69 ± 1.30 min. The factors associated with the DAP included screening time, appearance of metal objects in the field, and use of collimation. In 98 cases with no metal object in the field and with collimation, the mean DAP was decreased to 2.96 ± 2.53 Gy cm2. This study evaluated the radiation dosage during VFSS in children according to age groups and the influencing factors such as screening time, appearance of metal objects in the field, and use of collimation in VFSS. To reduce radiation risk, it is important to identify and control modifiable factors.

KEYWORDS:

Child; Deglutition; Deglutition disorders; Radiation

PMID:
30945001
DOI:
10.1007/s00455-019-10006-z

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