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Oxid Med Cell Longev. 2019 Mar 3;2019:8637970. doi: 10.1155/2019/8637970. eCollection 2019.

Relationship of Oxidative Stress as a Link between Diabetes Mellitus and Major Depressive Disorder.

Author information

1
Translational Psychiatry Laboratory, Graduate Program in Health Sciences, Health Sciences Unit, University of Southern Santa Catarina, Criciúma, SC, Brazil.
2
Programa de Pós-graduação em Saúde Coletiva, Universidade do Extremo Sul Catarinense, Criciúma, SC, Brazil.
3
Center of Excellence on Mood Disorders, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, McGovern Medical School, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth), Houston, TX, USA.
4
Translational Psychiatry Program, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, McGovern Medical School, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth), Houston, TX, USA.
5
Neuroscience Graduate Program, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth), Houston, TX, USA.

Abstract

Both conditions, major depressive disorder (MDD) and diabetes mellitus (DM) are chronic and disabling diseases that affect a very significant percentage of the world's population. Studies have been shown that patients with DM are more susceptible to develop depression, when compared to the general population. The opposite also happens; MDD could be a risk factor for DM development. Some mechanisms have been proposed to explain the pathophysiological mechanisms involved with these conditions, such as excess of glucocorticoids, hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, and inflammation. These processes can lead to an increase in damage to biomolecules and a decrease in antioxidant defense capacity, leading to oxidative stress.

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