Format

Send to

Choose Destination
BMC Womens Health. 2019 Apr 3;19(1):53. doi: 10.1186/s12905-019-0744-z.

Women's circles as a culturally safe psychosocial intervention in Guatemalan indigenous communities: a community-led pilot randomised trial.

Author information

1
Participatory Research at McGill (PRAM), Department of Family Medicine, McGill University, 5858 Chemin de la Côte-des-Neiges-3rd floor, Suite 300, Montréal, QC, H3S 1Z1, Canada. anne.chomat@mcgill.ca.
2
CIET International Guatemala, 5ª calle 14-35, apartamento 304, Edificio Las Tapias, zona 3, Quetzaltenango, Guatemala. anne.chomat@mcgill.ca.
3
CIET International Guatemala, 5ª calle 14-35, apartamento 304, Edificio Las Tapias, zona 3, Quetzaltenango, Guatemala.
4
Participatory Research at McGill (PRAM), Department of Family Medicine, McGill University, 5858 Chemin de la Côte-des-Neiges-3rd floor, Suite 300, Montréal, QC, H3S 1Z1, Canada.
5
Centro de Investigación de Enfermedades Tropicales (CIET), Universidad Autónoma de Guerrero, Acapulco, Mexico.
6
Research Center for the Prevention of Chronic Diseases (CIIPEC), Institute of Nutrition of Central America and Panama (INCAP), Calzada Roosevelt 6-25 zona 11, Apartado Postal 1188, Guatemala City, Guatemala.
7
Department of Psychiatry and Division of Social and Transcultural Psychiatry, McGill University, Montréal, Canada.
8
Centre for Global Mental Health, King's College London, De Crespigny Park, London, SE5 8AF, UK.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Indigenous Maya women in Guatemala show some of the worst maternal health indicators worldwide. Our objective was to test acceptability, feasibility and impact of a co-designed group psychosocial intervention (Women's Circles) in a population with significant need but no access to mental health services.

METHODS:

A parallel group pilot randomised study was undertaken in five rural Mam and three periurban K'iche' communities. Participants included 84 women (12 per community, in seven of the communities) randomly allocated to intervention and 71 to control groups; all were pregnant and/or within 2 years postpartum. The intervention consisted of 10 sessions co-designed with and facilitated by 16 circle leaders. Main outcome measures were: maternal psychosocial distress (HSCL-25), wellbeing (MHC-SF), self-efficacy and engagement in early infant stimulation activities. In-depth interviews also assessed acceptability and feasibility.

RESULTS:

The intervention proved feasible and well accepted by circle leaders and participating women. 1-month post-intervention, wellbeing scores (p-value 0.008) and self-care self-efficacy (0.049) scores were higher among intervention compared to control women. Those women who attended more sessions had higher wellbeing (0.007), self-care and infant-care self-efficacy (0.014 and 0.043, respectively), and early infant stimulation (0.019) scores.

CONCLUSIONS:

The pilot demonstrated acceptability, feasibility and potential efficacy to justify a future definitive randomised controlled trial. Co-designed women's groups provide a safe space where indigenous women can collectively improve their functioning and wellbeing.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

ISRCTN13964819 . Registered 26 June 2018, retrospectively registered.

KEYWORDS:

Co-design; Cultural safety; Guatemala; Indigenous women; Maternal mental health; Participatory research; Women’s circles

PMID:
30943958
PMCID:
PMC6448212
DOI:
10.1186/s12905-019-0744-z
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for BioMed Central Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center