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R I Med J (2013). 2019 Apr 1;102(3):34-37.

Attitudes Toward Advocacy Do Not Match Actions: A Cross-sectional Survey of Residents and Fellows.

Author information

1
Assistant Professor, Department of Medicine, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco VA Medical Center, San Francisco, CA.
2
Clinical Instructor, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA.
3
Statistician, Lifespan Biostatistics Core, Rhode Island Hospital, Providence, RI.
4
Division of Hematology and Oncology, Rhode Island Hospital, The Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, RI.
5
Associate Professor, Department of Medicine, The Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, RI.

Abstract

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVE:

We sought to determine baseline physician advocacy knowledge and attitudes of resident and fellow trainees at our institution to inform future graduate medical education (GME) activities.

METHODS:

A cross-sectional survey was developed and administered to all house staff in 2014 at Lifespan Hospitals, affiliated with The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University.

RESULTS:

The response rate was 24% (134/558). Eighty-eight percent reported voting in the 2012 presidential election, with lower participation in regional elections. Less than 25% felt comfortable explaining the Affordable Care Act, communicating with media, or influencing legislation on a health care issue. The majority (94%) agreed that "as a physician I have a duty to advocate." Few reported receiving adequate advocacy training in medical school (18%) or residency (12%).

CONCLUSIONS:

House staff agreed that physicians have a duty to advocate, but this did not translate into knowledge or action. GME should increase curricular efforts for trainees in the health care advocacy domain.

KEYWORDS:

advocacy training; graduate medical education; physician advocacy

PMID:
30943670
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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