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J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol. 2019 Jun;190:115-125. doi: 10.1016/j.jsbmb.2019.03.025. Epub 2019 Mar 30.

First international descriptive and interventional survey for cholesterol and non-cholesterol sterol determination by gas- and liquid-chromatography-Urgent need for harmonisation of analytical methods.

Author information

1
Institute of Clinical Chemistry and Clinical Pharmacology, University Hospital, Bonn, Germany. Electronic address: dieter.luetjohann@ukbonn.de.
2
Department of Laboratory Medicine, Division of Clinical Chemistry, Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden.
3
Institute of Clinical Chemistry and Clinical Pharmacology, University Hospital, Bonn, Germany.
4
German Reference Institute for Bioanalytics, Bonn, Germany.
5
Leibniz-Institut für Analytische Wissenschaften-ISAS-e.V., Dortmund, Germany.
6
ESTESC-Coimbra Health School, Coimbra, Portugal.
7
Department of Nutrition, Food Science and Physiology, Faculty of Pharmacy and Nutrition, University of Navarra, Pamplona, Spain.
8
Hospital Universitario Miguel Servet, IIS Aragón, CIBERV, Zaragoza, Spain.
9
Institute of Laboratory Medicine, Clinical Chemistry and Molecular Diagnostics, University Hospital Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany; Department of Pediatric Surgery, University of Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany.
10
Centre des Sciences du Goŭt et de l'Alimentation, AgroSup Dijon, CNRS, INRA, Université Bourgogne Franche-Comté, Dijon, France.
11
Biotechnical and Clinical Laboratory Sciences, Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY, United States.
12
Laboratory of Clinical Chemistry, Hospital of Varese, ASST-Settelaghi, Varese, Italy; Laboratory of Clinical Pathology, Foundation IRCCS Istituto Neurologico Carlo Besta, Milan, Italy.
13
Institute of Laboratory Medicine, Clinical Chemistry and Molecular Diagnostics, University Hospital Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany.
14
Institute of Life Science, Swansea University Medical School, Swansea, United Kingdom.
15
Clinical Institute of Medical and Chemical Laboratory Diagnostics, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria.
16
Nutrition and Food Science Area, University of Valencia, Burjassot, Valencia, Spain.
17
Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences & Medicine King´s College London, London, UK.
18
University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Central Hospital, Internal Medicine and Abdominal Center, Helsinki, Finland.
19
Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences & Medicine King´s College London, London, UK; Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Science, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John's, Canada.
20
Institute of Laboratory Medicine, Clinical Chemistry and Molecular Diagnostics, University Hospital Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany; Institute of Pharmacology, Pharmacy and Toxicology VMF, University of Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany.
21
Department of Medico-Surgical Sciences and Biotechnology, Vascular Biology and Mass Spectrometry Laboratory, Sapienza University of Rome, Latina, Italy.
22
Unilever Research and Development, Analytical Sciences, Vlaardingen, the Netherlands.
23
Richardson Centre for Functional Foods and Nutraceuticals, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.
24
Centrum für Laboratoriumsmedizin, Zentrallaboratorium, Universitätsklinikum Münster, Münster, Germany.
25
Faculty of Medical Sciences, Endocrinology and Metabolism Division, University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil.
26
Institute of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine, University Hospital Regensburg, Regensburg, Germany.
27
Department of Molecular Genetics, Southwestern Medical Center, University of Texas, Dallas, United States.
28
Core Laboratory for Clinical Studies, Division of Endocrinology, Metabolism and Lipid Research, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, 63110, United States.
29
Boston Heart Diagnostics, Framingham, MA, United States.
30
REQUIMTE/LAQV, Health Sciences Campus, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal.
31
Department of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, School of Public Health and Health Professions, University of Buffalo, Bufalo, NY, United States.
32
Institute of Clinical Chemistry and Clinical Pharmacology, University Hospital, Bonn, Germany; Leibniz-Institut für Analytische Wissenschaften-ISAS-e.V., Dortmund, Germany.

Abstract

Serum concentrations of lathosterol, the plant sterols campesterol and sitosterol and the cholesterol metabolite 5α-cholestanol are widely used as surrogate markers of cholesterol synthesis and absorption, respectively. Increasing numbers of laboratories utilize a broad spectrum of well-established and recently developed methods for the determination of cholesterol and non-cholesterol sterols (NCS). In order to evaluate the quality of these measurements and to identify possible sources of analytical errors our group initiated the first international survey for cholesterol and NCS. The cholesterol and NCS survey was structured as a two-part survey which took place in the years 2013 and 2014. The first survey part was designed as descriptive, providing information about the variation of reported results from different laboratories. A set of two lyophilized pooled sera (A and B) was sent to twenty laboratories specialized in chromatographic lipid analysis. The different sterols were quantified either by gas chromatography-flame ionization detection, gas chromatography- or liquid chromatography-mass selective detection. The participants were requested to determine cholesterol and NCS concentrations in the provided samples as part of their normal laboratory routine. The second part was designed as interventional survey. Twenty-two laboratories agreed to participate and received again two different lyophilized pooled sera (C and D). In contrast to the first international survey, each participant received standard stock solutions with defined concentrations of cholesterol and NCS. The participants were requested to use diluted calibration solutions from the provided standard stock solutions for quantification of cholesterol and NCS. In both surveys, each laboratory used its own internal standard (5α-cholestane, epicoprostanol or deuterium labelled sterols). Main outcome of the survey was, that unacceptably high interlaboratory variations for cholesterol and NCS concentrations are reported, even when the individual laboratories used the same calibration material. We discuss different sources of errors and recommend all laboratories analysing cholesterol and NCS to participate in regular quality control programs.

KEYWORDS:

Atherosclerosis; Cholesterol absorption; Cholesterol balance; Cholesterol synthesis; Phytosterols; Surrogate marker

PMID:
30940596
PMCID:
PMC6525271
DOI:
10.1016/j.jsbmb.2019.03.025
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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