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Behav Brain Sci. 2019 Jan;42:e37. doi: 10.1017/S0140525X18001905.

A neural basis for food foraging in obesity.

Author information

1
Centre for Nutrition Research,University of Navarra,31008 Pamplona,Spain.ealmiron@unav.esjalfmtz@unav.eshttps://www.unav.edu/en/web/investigacion/nuestros-investigadores/detalle-investigadores-cv?investigadorId=374171&investigador=Almiron%20Roig,%20Evahttps://www.unav.edu/en/web/investigacion/nuestros-investigadores/detalle-investigadores-cv?investigadorId=17264&investigador=Martinez%20Hernandez,%20Jose%20Alfredo.
2
Laboratory of Neuroimaging, Centre for Applied Medical Research,University of Navarra School of Medicine Hospital,31008 Pamplona,Spain.mapastor@unav.eshttps://www.unav.edu/web/investigacion/nuestros-investigadores/detalle-investigadores-cv?investigadorId=14475&investigador=Pastor%20Mu%C3%B1oz,%20Mar%C3%ADa%20A.
3
Center for Public Health Nutrition,University of Washington,Seattle, WA 98195.adamdrew@u.washington.eduhttps://epi.washington.edu/faculty/drewnowski-adam.

Abstract

Poverty-related food insecurity can be viewed as a form of economic and nutritional uncertainty that can lead, in some situations, to a desire for more filling and satisfying food. Given the current obesogenic food environment and the nature of the food supply, those food choices could engage a combination of sensory, neurophysiological, and genetic factors as potential determinants of obesity.

PMID:
30940250
DOI:
10.1017/S0140525X18001905
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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