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Nat Med. 2019 Apr;25(4):547-553. doi: 10.1038/s41591-019-0412-8. Epub 2019 Apr 1.

Broadly neutralizing anti-HIV-1 monoclonal antibodies in the clinic.

Author information

1
Laboratory of Molecular Immunology, Rockefeller University, New York, NY, USA. mcaskey@rockefeller.edu.
2
Laboratory of Experimental Immunology, Institute of Virology, University of Cologne, Faculty of Medicine and University Hospital of Cologne, Cologne, Germany. florian.klein@uk-koeln.de.
3
Center for Molecular Medicine Cologne (CMMC), University of Cologne, Faculty of Medicine, Cologne, Germany. florian.klein@uk-koeln.de.
4
German Center for Infection Research, partner site Bonn-Cologne, Cologne, Germany. florian.klein@uk-koeln.de.
5
Laboratory of Molecular Immunology, Rockefeller University, New York, NY, USA. nussen@rockefeller.edu.
6
Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Rockefeller University, New York, NY, USA. nussen@rockefeller.edu.

Abstract

Combination anti-retroviral therapy (ART) has revolutionized the treatment and prevention of HIV-1 infection. Taken daily, ART prevents and suppresses the infection. However, ART interruption almost invariably leads to rebound viremia in infected individuals due to a long-lived latent reservoir of integrated proviruses. Therefore, ART must be administered on a life-long basis. Here we review recent preclinical and clinical studies suggesting that immunotherapy may be an alternative or an adjuvant to ART because, in addition to preventing new infections, anti-HIV-1 antibodies clear the virus, directly kill infected cells and produce immune complexes that can enhance host immunity to the virus.

PMID:
30936546
DOI:
10.1038/s41591-019-0412-8
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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