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J Cyst Fibros. 2019 Mar 29. pii: S1569-1993(19)30060-8. doi: 10.1016/j.jcf.2019.03.007. [Epub ahead of print]

The impact of cystic fibrosis-related diabetes on health-related quality of life.

Author information

1
Division of Respiratory Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
2
Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
3
Division of Respiratory Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada; Centre for Heart Lung Innovation, St Paul's Hospital and the University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
4
Division of Respiratory Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada; Centre for Heart Lung Innovation, St Paul's Hospital and the University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. Electronic address: bradley.quon@hli.ubc.ca.

Abstract

Cystic fibrosis-related diabetes (CFRD) is a well-known comorbidity among the CF population. To investigate whether CFRD impacts health-related quality of life (HRQoL), domain scores from the Cystic Fibrosis Questionnaire-Revised for adolescents and adults over 14 years old (CFQ-R 14+) were compared between CF individuals with CFRD on insulin, CFRD not on insulin, impaired glucose tolerance, and normal blood glucose tolerance. The median score for the Treatment Burden domain was significantly worse for individuals with CFRD on insulin (p < 0.001) compared to the other diagnostic groups, and this association remained significant following adjustment for confounding variables. In conclusion, the additional requirement for insulin significantly contributes to treatment burden in adults with CFRD and therefore novel strategies to reduce treatment burden for this group are urgently needed.

KEYWORDS:

CFQ-R teen/adult version; Cystic fibrosis-related diabetes; Health-related quality of life; Insulin

PMID:
30935840
DOI:
10.1016/j.jcf.2019.03.007

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