Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Cancer Epidemiol. 2019 Jun;60:102-105. doi: 10.1016/j.canep.2019.03.012. Epub 2019 Mar 30.

Differences in cancer incidence by age at diagnosis between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people for cancer types included in Australian national screening programs.

Author information

1
Cancer Institute NSW, GPO Box 41, Alexandria, Sydney NSW 1435, Australia. Electronic address: hanna.tervonen@health.nsw.gov.au.
2
Cancer Institute NSW, GPO Box 41, Alexandria, Sydney NSW 1435, Australia; School of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of New South Wales, UNSW Sydney 2052, Australia. Electronic address: Stephen.Morrell@health.nsw.gov.au.
3
Cancer Institute NSW, GPO Box 41, Alexandria, Sydney NSW 1435, Australia; School of Health Sciences, Cancer Epidemiology and Population Health, University of South Australia, GPO Box 2471, Adelaide SA 5001, Australia. Electronic address: David.Roder@unisa.edu.au.
4
Cancer Institute NSW, GPO Box 41, Alexandria, Sydney NSW 1435, Australia. Electronic address: Hui.You@health.nsw.gov.au.
5
Cancer Institute NSW, GPO Box 41, Alexandria, Sydney NSW 1435, Australia. Electronic address: David.Currow@health.nsw.gov.au.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

This study examined age distributions and age-specific incidence of screened cancers by Aboriginal status in New South Wales (NSW) to consider the appropriateness of screening target age ranges.

METHODS:

The NSW Cancer Registry identified invasive (female) breast, cervical and bowel cancers in people diagnosed in 2001-2014.

RESULTS:

Aboriginal people were younger at diagnosis with higher proportions of breast and bowel cancers diagnosed before the screening target age range (<50 years) compared with non-Aboriginal people (30.6% vs. 22.8%, and 17.3% vs. 7.3%, respectively). Age-specific incidence rate ratios (IRRs) were lower/similar for breast and bowel cancers in younger and higher in older Aboriginal than non-Aboriginal people. All age-specific cervical cancer IRRs were higher for Aboriginal compared with non-Aboriginal people.

CONCLUSION:

Although higher proportions of breast and colorectal cancers were diagnosed before screening commencement age in Aboriginal people, this does not necessarily indicate a need for earlier screening commencement. Other aspects needing consideration include benefits, harms and cost-effectiveness.

KEYWORDS:

Australia; Cancer screening; Early detection of cancer; Indigenous; Neoplasms

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center