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JDR Clin Trans Res. 2019 Apr;4(2):106-115. doi: 10.1177/2380084418816079. Epub 2019 Jan 25.

A Systematic Review of Exposure to Bisphenol A from Dental Treatment.

Author information

1
1 Department of General Dentistry, Eastman Institute for Oral Health, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, USA.
2
2 Department of Pediatrics / Seattle Children's Research Institute, Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.
3
3 Department of Pediatric Dentistry, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.
4
4 Department of Global Health, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.
5
5 Division of Craniofacial Medicine, Department of Pediatrics / Seattle Children's Research Institute, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION::

Dental composite restorations and dental sealants containing bisphenol A glycidyl methacrylate (BisGMA) are commonly used materials in dentistry. Bisphenol A (BPA) is used to manufacture BisGMA and can be a by-product in BisGMA-based dental materials. BPA is an endocrine-disrupting chemical that may affect reproductive, psychological, cognitive, and endocrine-related health. We conducted a systematic review of clinical studies that measured urinary BPA (uBPA) concentrations before and after dental treatment to evaluate the extent to which individuals are exposed to BPA from dental treatment.

METHODS::

Eligibility included studies that measured uBPA concentrations before and after dental treatment with any type of resin-based dental material. We searched PubMed, Cochrane, Web of Science, Virtual Health Library, Science Direct, ProQuest, and Clinical Trials with no date or language restrictions to identify published studies. We summarized eligible studies across participant characteristics, amount of treatment, and time of follow-up measures. Because methods of measuring uBPA varied, our primary outcome was the direction and percentage change between baseline and 24 h posttreatment and at later time points as available.

RESULTS::

We identified 1,190 abstracts and 7 eligible studies: 4 in children and 3 in adults. In all studies, BPA concentrations increased 24 h after treatment. The 2 studies with the largest sample sizes found statistically significant increases >40% in uBPA concentrations at 24 h posttreatment (both P values <0.01). The 1 study to examine uBPA concentrations beyond 1 mo posttreatment found that concentrations returned to baseline by 14 d after treatment and remained at baseline 6 mo after treatment.

CONCLUSIONS::

Our findings suggest that uBPA concentrations increase 24 h after dental treatment. One study showed that uBPA concentrations return to baseline by 14 d. Additional research is needed to determine the magnitude of change from pre- to post-dental treatment and the trajectory of uBPA concentrations posttreatment.

KNOWLEDGE TRANSFER STATEMENT::

BPA is an endocrine-disrupting chemical that may have negative human health effects. Our findings suggest that urinary BPA concentrations increase in the short term after dental treatment. The extent to which such an increase may affect the health of patients remains an open question, particularly since there are no established thresholds for safety or harm related to BPA exposure.

KEYWORDS:

bisphenol A-glycidyl methacrylate; chromatography; composite resins; dental resins; humans; urine

PMID:
30931707
DOI:
10.1177/2380084418816079

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