Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract. 2019 Mar 28. pii: S2213-2198(19)30307-1. doi: 10.1016/j.jaip.2019.03.026. [Epub ahead of print]

Maternal Perinatal Dietary Patterns Affect Food Allergy Development in Susceptible Infants.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Seoul, Korea; Institute of Allergy, Severance Biomedical Science Institute, Brain Korea 21 Project for Medical Science, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
2
Institute of Allergy, Severance Biomedical Science Institute, Brain Korea 21 Project for Medical Science, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea; Department of Pediatrics, Severance Hospital, Seoul, Korea.
3
Department of Pediatrics, Childhood Asthma Atopy Center, Environmental Health Center, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
4
Department of Food and Nutrition, Research Institute of Human Ecology, Kyung Hee University, Seoul, Korea.
5
Biomedical Research Institute, Kangwon National University Hospital, Chuncheon, Korea.
6
Department of Pediatrics, Dangook University Hospital, Cheonan, Korea.
7
Department of Pediatrics, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
8
Department of Pediatrics, CHA Gangnam Medical Center, CHA University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
9
Department of Pediatrics, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
10
Department of Pediatrics, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon, Korea.
11
Institute of Allergy, Severance Biomedical Science Institute, Brain Korea 21 Project for Medical Science, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea; Department of Pediatrics, Severance Hospital, Seoul, Korea. Electronic address: mhsohn@yuhs.ac.
12
Department of Pediatrics, Childhood Asthma Atopy Center, Environmental Health Center, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. Electronic address: sjhong@amc.seoul.kr.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The increasing incidence of food allergy (FA) can be attributed to interactions between genes and the environment, but these interactions are not yet fully clear.

OBJECTIVE:

We aimed to evaluate the interaction between infant genetic variations and maternal dietary patterns to identify risk factors in the development of FA.

METHODS:

We used the Cohort for Childhood Origin of Asthma and allergic diseases birth cohort of 1628 infants, born between 2007 and 2015. Maternal dietary intakes were assessed at 26 weeks of pregnancy using a food frequency questionnaire and grouped according to 5 dietary patterns. Infant cord blood samples were genotyped at 12 loci.

RESULTS:

Among 1628 infants, 147 (9.0%) were diagnosed with FA based on history. A maternal confectionery diet characterized by a higher intake of baked and sugary products during pregnancy was associated with a higher prevalence of FA (adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 1.517, P = .02); this dietary pattern tended to be higher in trans fat (r = 0.498, P < .001). Development of FA was associated with longer periods of breastfeeding (adjusted OR = 1.792, P = .03), and this dietary pattern was more significantly related to the development of FA in infants with the homozygous TT genotype of CD14 (rs2569190) and more than 1 copy of GSTM1 and GSTT1.

CONCLUSIONS:

A maternal confectionery diet during pregnancy that majorly consists of baked and sugary products, combined with a longer ensuing period of breastfeeding, may lead to the development of FA, suggesting a harmful effect of trans fats in the infant. Polymorphisms in CD14 and GST in the infant influence FA susceptibility.

KEYWORDS:

CD14; Confectionary; Dietary pattern; Fatty acids; Food allergy; GST; Genetics; Infant; Perinatal; Polymorphism

PMID:
30930272
DOI:
10.1016/j.jaip.2019.03.026

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center