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J Clin Psychol Med Settings. 2019 Mar 28. doi: 10.1007/s10880-019-09615-5. [Epub ahead of print]

Long-Term Posttraumatic Stress Following Accidental Injury in Children and Adolescents: Results of a 2-4-Year Follow-Up Study.

Author information

1
Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Amsterdam UMC, University of Amsterdam, Meibergdreef 5, 1105 AZ, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. e.p.vanmeijel@amc.uva.nl.
2
de Bascule, Academic Center for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. e.p.vanmeijel@amc.uva.nl.
3
Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Amsterdam UMC, University of Amsterdam, Meibergdreef 5, 1105 AZ, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
4
de Bascule, Academic Center for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
5
Pediatric Surgical Center of Amsterdam, Amsterdam UMC, Emma Children's Hospital, University of Amsterdam & VU University, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
6
Trauma Unit Department of Surgery, Amsterdam UMC, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
7
Department of Trauma Surgery, Amsterdam UMC, VU University, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
8
Emergency Department, Amsterdam UMC, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
9
Pediatric Psychology Department of the Emma Children's Hospital, Amsterdam UMC, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
10
Princess Maxima Center for Pediatric Oncology, Wilhelmina Children's Hospital, Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Abstract

In this study, we determined the long-term prevalence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in children and adolescents after accidental injury and gained insight into factors that may be associated with the occurrence of PTSD. In a prospective longitudinal study, we assessed diagnosed PTSD and clinically significant self-reported posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS) in 90 children (11-22 years of age, 60% boys), 2-4 years after their accident (mean number of months 32.9, SD 6.6). The outcome was compared to the first assessment 3 months after the accident in 147 children, 8-18 years of age. The prevalence of PTSD was 11.6% at first assessment and 11.4% at follow-up. Children with PTSD or PTSS reported significantly more permanent physical impairment than children without. Children who completed psychotherapy had no symptoms or low levels of symptoms at follow-up. Given the long-term prevalence of PTSD in children following accidents, we recommend systematic monitoring of injured children. The role of possible associated factors in long-term PTSS needs further study.

KEYWORDS:

Accidental injury; Adolescent; Child; Long term; Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD)

PMID:
30924029
DOI:
10.1007/s10880-019-09615-5

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