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Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2019 Dec;100(12):2371-2380. doi: 10.1016/j.apmr.2019.02.009. Epub 2019 Mar 26.

Does Intradialytic Exercise Improve Removal of Solutes by Hemodialysis? A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

Author information

1
Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Federal University of Pelotas, Pelotas, Brazil. Electronic address: gusdiasferreira@gmail.com.
2
Postgraduate Program in Health and Behavior, Catholic University of Pelotas, Pelotas, Brazil.
3
Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Federal University of Pelotas, Pelotas, Brazil.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To describe a systematic review and meta-analysis to identify if intradialytic exercise improves the removal of solutes and the hemodialysis adequacy.

DATA SOURCES:

A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were performed. The sources were MEDLINE (via PubMed), Web of Science, LILACS, and SciELO, from inception until July 2018.

STUDY SELECTION:

Clinical trials including patients on chronic hemodialysis submitted to the intervention of aerobic intradialytic exercise.

DATA EXTRACTION:

Evaluating as outcomes the removal of solutes (creatinine, phosphate, potassium) and/or adequacy parameters (Kt/V-urea).

DATA SYNTHESIS:

The systematic review included 23 studies (7 evaluating the effect of 1 exercise session and 16 evaluating the effect of training, lasting from 6 to 25 weeks). Eleven RCT were included in the meta-analyses. It was observed that the aerobic intradialytic exercise increased the Kt/V-urea (0.15; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.08-0.21) and decreased creatinine (-1.82 mg/dL; 95% CI, -2.50 to -1.13), despite the high heterogeneity of the analysis. No differences were found in phosphorus and potassium removal.

CONCLUSION:

The aerobic intradialytic exercise may be suggested to improve the Kt/V-urea and the creatinine removal during the dialysis.

KEYWORDS:

Exercise; Hemodialysis; Rehabilitation

PMID:
30922880
DOI:
10.1016/j.apmr.2019.02.009

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